A Right to the Baby WE WANT

Whenever I write about the underregulated multi-billion-dollar infertility industry, I receive anguished emails from women who can’t become pregnant, declaring that they “would do anything to have a baby.” I can certainly empathize with their sadness, but their willingness to do anything is a problem. This deep and very human yearning has led to the development of technologies that are moving us Read More ›


Media Ownership Reform Long Overdue

The Federal Communications Commission until now has failed to ensure that it’s media ownership rules keep pace with changes in the marketplace despite clear direction from Congress in the 1996 Telecom Act to review the rules every four years and repeal or modify those no longer necessary in the public interest as the result of competition. A prime example is Read More ›


Death Panels May Be Only Part of Obamacare to Die

Obamacare “repeal and replace” may have failed this year, but that doesn’t mean the Affordable Care Act can’t be significantly defanged. For example, there is still time to excise the Independent Payment Advisory Board from the law before it is up and running. IPAB’s stated purpose is to contain Medicare costs, a laudable goal. But the powers granted to the Read More ›


Columbus Day: A celebration of character

Columbus Day was originally established as a national holiday by FDR in 1937 to commemorate Christopher Columbus who discovered the New World on Oct. 12, 1492 when he made landfall on what is now known as San Salvador in the Bahama Islands. Although many give him credit, Columbus didn’t actually discover America, but he inspired many successors who explored coastal Read More ›


COMMENTARY: Columbus Day is celebration of character

Columbus Day was originally established as a national holiday by FDR in 1937 to commemorate Christopher Columbus, who “discovered” the New World on Oct. 12, 1492, when he made landfall on what is now known as San Salvador in the Bahamas. Of course, Columbus didn’t actually discover the region, but he inspired many successors who explored coastal lands and made Read More ›


Column: Columbus Day celebrates character

Columbus Day was established as a national holiday by FDR in 1937 to commemorate Christopher Columbus who discovered the New World on Oct. 12, 1492, when he made landfall on what is now known as San Salvador in the Bahama Islands. Although many give him credit, Columbus didn’t discover America, but he inspired many successors who explored coastal lands and Read More ›


The Spiral of Silence

Just two or three generations ago, most Americans understood that George Orwell’s classics “Animal Farm” and “1984” were written to explain how freedom is lost to totalitarianism and the intolerance that accompanies it. “Big Brother,” a term still casually used to describe an all-knowing governing authority, comes straight out of “1984.” In the state that Orwell describes, all subjects are Read More ›


Columbus Day is an opportunity to celebrate the virtues of the explorer

Columbus Day was established as a national holiday by FDR in 1937 to commemorate Christopher Columbus, who discovered the New World on Oct. 12, 1492, when he made landfall on what is now known as San Salvador in the Bahama Islands. Although many give him credit, Columbus didn’t discover America, but he inspired many successors who explored coastal lands and Read More ›


Euthanasia for Alzheimer’s Patients?

The medically vulnerable have rarely been in greater jeopardy. Alzheimer’s disease patients are at particular risk. In a recent poll from Quebec—where lethal-injection euthanasia is legal—a chilling 72 percent of caregivers favor permitting Alzheimer’s patients to be euthanized, even if the afflicted person never requested euthanasia. If the patient requested euthanasia in writing upon becoming incompetent, the percentage of caregivers Read More ›


Revisiting Orwell to Understand our Times

Just two or three generations ago, most Americans understood that George Orwell’s classics Animal Farm and 1984 were written to explain how freedom is lost to totalitarianism and the intolerance that accompanies it. “Big Brother,” a term still casually used to describe an all-knowing governing authority, comes right out of 1984. In the society that Orwell describes, everyone was reminded that Read More ›