Topic

abortion

dsf-2020-john-west

Darwin’s Corrosive Idea

In the case of Darwin’s idea of unguided evolution and of a planet of life formed from blind, merciless material processes alone, West notes a range of consequences and impacts, on how we see the sanctity of human, how we understand morality and spirituality, and much more. In an interview with Sir David Attenborough, in 2013, the famed evolutionist called Read More ›

The Link Between Breast Cancer and Abortion

The news about the dangers of abortion is getting out, despite suppression by scientists and other vested interests — in particular, the relationship of abortion and subsequent breast cancer in the youngest women, those under age 18. They should be informed about the abortion-breast cancer link, especially if they become pregnant unexpectedly. Read More ›

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Signing of H.R. 1553, the Caroline Pryce Walker Conquer Childhood Cancer Act of 2008. Oval.
From George W. Bush White House archives

Group’s Phony Charge: Bush Is Anti-Family

It is all well and good, as TomPaine.com does in its Feb. 19 blast at President Bush, to go after a political opponent. That would be fair, if it were based on fact. But the regulations being changed impact no families, adoptive or otherwise, because not a single state chose to implement them. To criticize President Bush for an action Read More ›

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Dantza
Licensed from Adobe Stock

Anthropology Afoul of the Facts

In 1928, Margaret Mead published Coming of Age in Samoa. An immediate success, this slender volume established Mead as the most famous and most influential anthropologist of the 20th century. For nearly half a century, whether writing scholarly articles from her desk at the American Museum of Natural History in New York or pontificating as contributing editor of the popular Read More ›

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baby sleeping
Photo by Ignacio Campo at Unsplash

Wrongful Birth?

Charles de Gaulle once remarked that France without greatness isn’t France. Nowadays, we’re wondering whether France without common sense can still lay claim to greatness, or to much of anything else. The wonderment is more than rhetorical. For the nation that once gave the world the “Declaration of the Rights of Man” now adds to its legal system a concept Read More ›

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Cells division process, Cell divides into two cells
Licensed from Adobe Stock

Cloning and Congress

WHAT’S LESS BAD: enacting a ban on so-called “reproductive” human cloning that explicitly authorizes cloning for research purposes, or passing no law at all prohibiting cloning in 2002? That is the seeming conundrum facing cloning opponents, since neither side in the great cloning debate apparently can muster the 60 votes needed to pass either a complete or partial cloning ban Read More ›

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Stem cell research for the treatment of cancer
Licensed from Adobe Stock

Michael Kinsley Out on a Limb

The Clinton Administration recently issued a new set of rules permitting federally funded research on embryonic stem cells. The guidelines were hailed in many quarters as a victory for “science.” But what kind of science? Astonishingly, some supporters are offering arguments that echo the ideas of the racist scientists who paved the way for the Third Reich. The medical value Read More ›