cosmology

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360 degree space nebula panorama, equirectangular projection, environment map. HDRI spherical panorama. Space background with nebula and stars

Steven Weinberg and the Twilight of the Godless Universe

With the passing last month of Steven Weinberg, the world lost a great theoretical physicist. Born to Jewish parents in New York in 1933, Weinberg received the Nobel Prize in 1979 for unifying two of the four fundamental forces of physics, the electromagnetic and weak nuclear forces. His proposed unification, later confirmed by experiment, proved key to the development of the Standard Model of particle physics, the best current theory of fundamental physics and our guide to the strange world of elementary particles. In addition, Weinberg made seminal contributions to quantum theory, general relativity and cosmology.

His death also marks the twilight of an increasingly dated view of the relationship between science and religion. Though Weinberg was a friend to the State of Israel, he was not sympathetic to Judaism or any theistic belief. Weinberg wrote many popular books about physics in which he often asserted that scientific advance had undermined belief in God – and, consequently, any ultimate meaning for human existence. The First Three Minutes, his most popular book published in 1977, famously concluded: “the more the universe seems comprehensible, the more it seems pointless.”

Weinberg’s aggressive science-based atheism now seems an increasingly spent force. Since 1977, Carl Sagan, Richard Dawkins, Stephen Hawking, Victor Stenger, Lawrence Krauss and many other scientists have published popular anti-theistic broadsides. Many of these stalwarts have since passed from the scene. Others have so overplayed their hands with overt attacks on religion that they have provoked even fellow atheists and agnostics to recoil.

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Brian Keating Interviews Stephen Meyer on Return of the God Hypothesis

Stephen Meyer discusses whether the laws of cosmology, physics, and biology exhibit evidence for Intelligent Design. Does Fine-Tuning imply a “Mind” behind the Cosmos, or was the appearance of design inevitable thanks to random fluctuations due to the capaciousness of the Multiverse? Meyer, author of the NYT Bestseller Darwin’s Doubt”, and Keating debate whether we can intuit the existence of Read More ›

Dr. Stephen Meyer: Return of the God Hypothesis

Building on the case for the intelligent design of life that he developed in Signature in the Cell and Darwin’s Doubt, Meyer demonstrates how discoveries in cosmology and physics coupled with those in biology help to establish the identity of the designing intelligence behind life and the universe. An interview with Eric Metaxas on The Eric Metaxas Show. Watch the Read More ›

Stephen Meyer: God and the Origin of the Universe

According to a nationwide survey, more than two-thirds of atheists and one-third of agnostics believe that “the findings of science make the existence of God less probable,” while nearly half of self-identified theists believe “the findings of science are neutral with regard to the existence of God.” But what if there is another option? What if the discoveries of science Read More ›

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The Actual, Nuanced Story of Galileo Galilei

The Galileo myth posits that the great astronomer’s story illustrates the near-inevitable conflict between science and religion — or “faith and fact.” As science historian Michael Keas explains, the story is actually more complicated, nuanced, and interesting than the myth would have it. In Unbelievable, Professor Keas explores seven myths about the history of science and faith. It’s a great read. Read More ›

Artist’s impression of exoplanet orbiting two stars
This artist’s impression shows a gas giant planet circling the two red dwarf stars in the system OGLE-2007-BLG-349, located 8 000 light-years away. The planet — with a mass similar to Saturn — orbits the two stars at a distance of roughly 480 million kilometres. The two red dwarf stars are a mere 11 million kilometres apart. The artist's impression is based on observations made with Hubble that helped astronomers confirm the existence of a planet orbiting The two stars in the system. The system is too far away for Hubble to take an image of the planet. Instead, its presence was inferred from gravitational microlensing. This phenomenon occurs when the gravity of a foreground star bends and amplifies the light of a background star that momentarily aligns with it. The particular character of the light magnification can reveal clues to the nature of the foreground star and any associated planets. The Hubble observations represent the first time such a three-body system has been confirmed using the gravitational microlensing technique.
An exoplanet (artist’s rendering), by ESA/Hubble [CC BY 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons.

Exoplanets and the Fermi Paradox

We are living during a golden age of discovery in astronomy. Arguably, it began with the dawning of the space age in 1957. By 1989 our probes had visited every planet in the Solar System (in 2015 New Horizons visited the former planet Pluto). Then, in 1995 we discovered the first planet around another star (an exoplanet). Read More ›
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Origin – Trailer

This long awaited sequel to Unlocking the Mystery of Life explores one of the most important and challenging questions faced by science: How did life on Earth begin? Origin effectively confronts scientific materialism and the belief that life is the product of undirected processes, matter and energy. Instead, the origin of the first life is best explained by intelligent design Read More ›