Category

Religion and Civic Life

Delicious roasted whole chicken or turkey on plate with cutlery and sauce , harvest grilled vegetables on dark rustic background, top view, banner, frame. Thanksgiving Day food
Delicious roasted whole chicken or turkey on plate with cutlery and sauce , harvest grilled vegetables on dark rustic background, top view, banner, frame. Thanksgiving Day food

One Person’s Journey to a Fasting Lifestyle: Week Three

In week three of the plan I lay out in the forthcoming Eat, Fast, Feast, fasters limit all of their food intake to four hours a day for at least three days during the week. (The days don’t have to be consecutive.) This is called the 20/4 routine, since you don’t eat for twenty consecutive hours of the day. (This includes sleep time of course.) There’s still no attempt to eat less food during the day than you normally would. At this point, you’re just trying to get your body acclimated to going longer periods without food and using its fat-burning metabolism more effectively. This third week happened to land on Thanksgiving week, so I expected it to be even harder for our volunteer faster. Read More ›
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Beaded Rosary

One Person’s Journey to a Fasting Lifestyle: Week Two

In the first week of the six-week plan in my forthcoming book Eat, Fast, Feast, you eat a “ketogenic” diet to get your fat-burning metabolism up and running. This is a physical prerequisite for long-term fasting. In the second week, you begin to limit the amount of time during the day when you eat, starting with sixteen hours off, eight hours on. In other words, you eat all your meals with a single eight-hour time window. A few days ago, I checked in with my friend who volunteered to try out the plan and report his results. Read More ›
Delicious roasted whole chicken or turkey on plate with cutlery and sauce , harvest grilled vegetables on dark rustic background, top view, banner, frame. Thanksgiving Day food
Delicious roasted whole chicken or turkey on plate with cutlery and sauce , harvest grilled vegetables on dark rustic background, top view, banner, frame. Thanksgiving Day food

One Person’s Journey to a Fasting Lifestyle: Week One

In my forthcoming book Eat, Fast, Feast (available for pre-order now), I describe a six-week plan to help Christians make fasting a rewarding part of their lives. Most of us don’t really fast. Catholics do residual fasting — an hour before Mass, for instance. And we eat a little less on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday. These are really partial abstinences. The harsh truth is that we’ve abandoned the fasting discipline that defined most of Christian history and replaced it with excuses. Some evangelicals and evangelical churches fast, but it’s not anchored in the calendar or long-standing practice. So, it tends to go in and out of fashion, rather than becoming a permanent spiritual practice. Really the only Christian communities that have retained serious fasting are the Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Rite churches. They have something to teach the rest of us. Read More ›

Book Review: Why Are Jews Liberals? by Norman Podhoretz

Getting on the freeway the other morning on the way to the office, I noticed the car ahead of me had a Barack Obama ’08 sticker on its bumper. While that’s nothing unusual here in Seattle—it’s practically required—this sticker caught my eye. It was in Hebrew. Guessing that the other car must belong to a neighbor or near-neighbor, I was Read More ›

Public Life in the Shadowlands: What C.S. Lewis Can Teach Us about Politics

Even before the film Shadowlands, C. S. Lewis was probably the most widely recognized Christian thinker of the twentieth century. By the end of the 1980s, his books already had sold more than seventy million copies, an achievement that surely places Lewis among the best-selling authors of all time. Lewis is most appreciated today for his superlative imagination and his Read More ›

Where is the rabbi like Richard John Neuhaus?

The death last week of a brilliant Catholic priest and intellectual, a foremost conservative Christian leader in the United States, occasions dissatisfied reflections on the condition of Jewish religious leadership. Where is the rabbi like Richard John Neuhaus? Father Neuhaus died at 72, full of accomplishments. In the days after his passing, writers of tributes compared him to the late Read More ›

My Plymouth Pilgrimage

There must be something deeply ingrained in the human psyche about going on pilgrimages, for when I had a chance last year to take my wife and two small children to visit New England after speaking at a conference, I jumped at the opportunity. What could be more worthwhile than showing my family the cradle of American liberty? I especially Read More ›

God and Man on Election Day

This article, published by National Review, contains an interview with Discovery Institute Senior Fellow David Klinghoffer: David Klinghoffer, an orthodox Jew, believes the Bible is undersold as a political guide. He hopes to make a few sales to voters in his new book How Would God Vote? He recently took some questions from National Review Online editor Kathryn Lopez. The Read More ›

Bill Buckley’s Religion, And My Own

Were it not for William F. Buckley Jr., who died last week, a Roman Catholic with profound and very public Christian convictions, it seems doubtful that I would be a Jew today. Does this sound unlikely? Recently I was complaining to my wife, Nika, about a habit among some of our fellow Orthodox Jews, who talk about what rabbi “mekareved” Read More ›

Rudy of the Good Book?

The Giuliani candidacy has polarized politically conservative Christians and Jews — perhaps less over Rudy’s position on abortion than, more subtly, over a question of emphasis. Who’s right? The Jewish “neoconservatives,” who make up more than half of Giuliani’s star foreign-policy advisory team (Norman Podhoretz, Daniel Pipes, Michael Rubin, Martin Kramer, and David Frum)? Or Christians, like Family Research Council Read More ›