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Delicious roasted whole chicken or turkey on plate with cutlery and sauce , harvest grilled vegetables on dark rustic background, top view, banner, frame. Thanksgiving Day food
Delicious roasted whole chicken or turkey on plate with cutlery and sauce , harvest grilled vegetables on dark rustic background, top view, banner, frame. Thanksgiving Day food

One Person’s Journey to a Fasting Lifestyle: Week Three

In week three of the plan I lay out in the forthcoming Eat, Fast, Feast, fasters limit all of their food intake to four hours a day for at least three days during the week. (The days don’t have to be consecutive.) This is called the 20/4 routine, since you don’t eat for twenty consecutive hours of the day. (This includes sleep time of course.) There’s still no attempt to eat less food during the day than you normally would. At this point, you’re just trying to get your body acclimated to going longer periods without food and using its fat-burning metabolism more effectively. This third week happened to land on Thanksgiving week, so I expected it to be even harder for our volunteer faster. Read More ›

Leading Economist and Developer of Time-Prices, Dr. Gale Pooley Appointed as a Fellow of Discovery Institute

Seattle — Discovery Institute is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Gale L. Pooley to serve as a fellow with the Institute’s Center on Wealth and Poverty. “Gale Pooley is the world leader in the most important movement in contemporary economics—based on the recognition that wealth is knowledge, money is time, and the only true prices are time prices,” Read More ›

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Beaded Rosary

One Person’s Journey to a Fasting Lifestyle: Week Two

In the first week of the six-week plan in my forthcoming book Eat, Fast, Feast, you eat a “ketogenic” diet to get your fat-burning metabolism up and running. This is a physical prerequisite for long-term fasting. In the second week, you begin to limit the amount of time during the day when you eat, starting with sixteen hours off, eight hours on. In other words, you eat all your meals with a single eight-hour time window. A few days ago, I checked in with my friend who volunteered to try out the plan and report his results. Read More ›
Photo by John Moeses Bauan

Christopher Rufo Featured in WORLD Magazine Story on Tiny Houses

Seattle plans to stop funding another tiny house village for the homeless after months of fighting with the property’s managers. It will be the second time the city has closed down a tiny house development. Northlake Village, one of nine tiny house villages the city has built since 2015, opened in March 2018. A nonprofit group called the Low Income Housing Institute (LIHI) managed it and subcontracted with Nickelsville, an activist organization of homeless and formerly homeless people. Sharon Lee, LIHI executive director, said Nickelsville did not make residents look for permanent housing or work with a case manager. They also used evictions “arbitrarily and unjustly made people homeless again,” Lee said. Tension grew, and in April, Nickelsville refused to allow LIHI or city staff on the property. They closed the gates with padlocks and posted signs telling the residents working security to keep LIHI or city staff out. In September, the city gave LIHI an Oct. 7 deadline to enroll residents in the city’s Homeless Management Information System. LIHI failed to comply, blaming Nickelsville for not cooperating. Read More ›
US Capitol

Is America on a Slippery Slope Toward Becoming a Banana Republic?

Who would have ever thought the United States could lose its way and find itself on a slippery slope to becoming a banana republic in which political power is typically determined by coups rather than elections? But it appears many in the Democratic Party are willing to go down this road and risk the nation’s continuity and stability in a desperate effort to regain power and control. Since there is simply no greater crime against the United States, its Constitution and its people than subverting the government that is duly elected by the people, Americans need to clearly remind Washington that the legitimacy of our government comes exclusively from the people. Think about it... why should Democrats in Congress be ignoring their legislative responsibilities and wasting their time and the nation’s scarce resources with impeachment proceedings less than a year away from the next presidential election? And why would Democrats think impeachment a wise course to follow, particularly after putting the country through nearly two years of the Mueller investigation? Read More ›
Delicious roasted whole chicken or turkey on plate with cutlery and sauce , harvest grilled vegetables on dark rustic background, top view, banner, frame. Thanksgiving Day food
Delicious roasted whole chicken or turkey on plate with cutlery and sauce , harvest grilled vegetables on dark rustic background, top view, banner, frame. Thanksgiving Day food

One Person’s Journey to a Fasting Lifestyle: Week One

In my forthcoming book Eat, Fast, Feast (available for pre-order now), I describe a six-week plan to help Christians make fasting a rewarding part of their lives. Most of us don’t really fast. Catholics do residual fasting — an hour before Mass, for instance. And we eat a little less on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday. These are really partial abstinences. The harsh truth is that we’ve abandoned the fasting discipline that defined most of Christian history and replaced it with excuses. Some evangelicals and evangelical churches fast, but it’s not anchored in the calendar or long-standing practice. So, it tends to go in and out of fashion, rather than becoming a permanent spiritual practice. Really the only Christian communities that have retained serious fasting are the Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Rite churches. They have something to teach the rest of us. Read More ›
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Why Experts Say the Pacific Northwest is a ‘Perfect Laboratory’ for Autonomous Technology

The hype cycle for autonomous vehicles may have slowed down after the March 2018 fatal accident involving a self-driving Uber car, but for AV booster Bruce Agnew, the Pacific Northwest offers a wide range of applications for the technology that go far beyond passengers traveling big-city streets. As director of ACES — a Madrona Venture Group and INRIX-backed network promoting autonomous, connected, electric, and shared vehicles — Agnew sees the diverse geography and economic opportunities of the region as ripe for those four trends to converge in transportation. While much of the attention on autonomous vehicles thus far has focused on their urban applications, as the everyday car driver imagines what it might be like to relinquish the wheel, that’s not where the technology is heading first, experts say. Read More ›
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Veterans Day: Celebration of a Greater Love

Veteran’s Day had its origin at the end of World War I in 1918, a conflict so horrendous that it was dubbed, “the Great War,” or “the war to end all wars,” with the United States playing the decisive role in the Allied powers’ final victory. It was first known as Armistice Day, celebrated on November 11 because that was Read More ›

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Discovery Fellow Christopher Rufo with Tucker Carlson on the West Coast Shoplifting Boom

There is a "shoplifting boom" that's hitting the major West Coast cities. Five years ago, California passed Proposition 47, which decriminalized drug possession and thefts under $950, which has led to a surge in property crime throughout the state. Policies like this hurt working families, create disorder on downtown streets, and drive California further into "Third World levels of inequality." Last night, I sat down with Tucker Carlson to discuss the "shoplifting boom." I was born and raised in California, so it's very difficult to see what's happened to my home state—but there's no end in sight to the rising chaos and disorder. Read More ›