Discovery News

sotc-secrets-of-the-cell-michael-behe

Secrets of the Cell

The elegance of nature: randomly evolved or purposefully designed? The answer lies in the cell. Michael Behe explores the building blocks of the life. Discover an unseen world of genetic coding, fabulous integrated systems, and astonishing machines. It’s not your typical biology class. It’s a five part series on complexity in nature: DNA, genes, mutation, and new science on the Read More ›

long-story-short-homology

Long Story Short: Is Homology Evidence for Evolution?

Is homology due to common descent or common design? Is descent with modification overwhelmingly obvious? The standard definition of homology is the similarity of the structure, physiology, or development of different species of organisms based upon their descent from a common evolutionary ancestor- the structural identity of parts in distinct species such as the human hand, the wing of a Read More ›

Sad girl pupil trying to solve an example. Schoolgirl stands with her forehead on the blackboard
Sad girl pupil trying to solve an example. Schoolgirl stands with her forehead on the blackboard.

We Are Failing Our Children

n 1983, the famous report, “A Nation at Risk” concluded that our country was failing to effectively educate our children. The authors were so critical of our schools that the preamble of the report summarized their findings by saying that; “if an unfriendly foreign power had imposed our schools upon us, we would have considered it an act of war.” That was 1983. In 1991, President George H.W. Bush held an education summit, called “Goals 2000.” Bill Clinton was the chair of that summit. After days of deliberation, another report was issued stating that, “by 2000, all children will enter school ready to learn and 90% of our children will graduate from high school.” Many other goals were listed, none of which were achieved. In 2001, President George W. Bush and Congress passed a bill called the, “No Child Left Behind Act.” This legislation was designed improve accountability and to help schools meet the needs of every student. It failed to make any meaningful difference in student performance. Read More ›
Westminster-Darwin-Devolves-2019-graphic

Design & Designer: The Convergence of Science & Theology

Given enough time, can bacteria mutate into insects by chance? Can random mutations account for the existence of butterflies and whales and platypuses? What about the origin of the universe or the origin of man's ability to reason? Come and hear scientists and scholars discuss the limitations of chance and the abundant testimonies to design, as they come to realization from physics to proteins. Read More ›
Predator Type Drone 3D artwork

A Moral Argument for Killer Robots: Why America’s Military Needs to Continue Development of Lethal AI

Doomsday headlines warn that the age of “killer robots” is upon us, and that new military technologies based on artificial intelligence (AI) will lead to the annihilation of the human race. In his new, short book The Case for Killer Robots: Why America’s Military Needs to Continue Development of Lethal AI (Discovery Institute Press 2020), artificial intelligence expert Robert J. Marks investigates the potential military use of lethal AI and examines the practical and ethical challenges. Dr. Marks directs the Walter Bradley Center for Natural and Artificial Intelligence at Discovery Institute, and he is a Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Baylor University. Marks also heads up the Center’s daily news website, Mind Matters News and hosts the Mind Matters Podcast. This short monograph is published in conjunction with the Walter Bradley Center for Natural and Artificial Intelligence and the Center is making if freely available as a digital book at the Mind Matters website. Physical copies are available through Amazon.com. “Marks makes a lucid and compelling case that we have a moral obligation to develop lethal AI,” said Jay Richards, philosopher and author, The Human Ad-vantage: The Future of American Work in an Age of Smart Machines. “He also reminds us that moral questions apply, not to the tools that we use to protect ourself, but to how we use them when war becomes a necessity.” Read More ›

Discovery Institute Announces New Fellow Tom Shakely Joining its Center on Human Exceptionalism

Discovery Institute is pleased to announce Tom Shakely , who serves as Chief Engagement Officer at Americans United for Life, has joined the Institute’s Center on Human Exceptionalism as a Research Fellow where he will focus on human dignity, human rights, and law and policy. Read More ›
David-Gelernter-Uncommon-Knowledge
Still of David Gelernter on Uncommon Knowledge with Peter Robinson via YouTube

#1 of Our Top Stories of 2019: Informed by Discovery Authors, Yale’s David Gelernter Rejects Darwinism

This is important. Yale University computer scientist David Gelernter is a polymath, a brilliant writer, artist, and thinker. Famed both for his specific scientific expertise, and for his cultural, political, and historical reflections, he’s also now a confessed Darwin skeptic. More than a skeptic really. In a wonderful essay in the new issue of The Claremont Review of Books, “Giving Up Darwin,” he credits reading Stephen Meyer’s book Darwin’s Doubt as the primary cause of his rejecting neo-Darwinian evolution, a “brilliant and beautiful scientific theory” but one that’s now been overtaken by science. Read More ›
stephen-c-meyer-id3-bechly

Dr. Stephen Meyer Talks About ID 3.0

Dr. Meyer introduces ID 3.0 by telling the remarkable story of how he first got to know German paleontologist Günter Bechly, formerly of the State Museum of Natural History in Stuttgart, but expelled after Bechly came out as an ID proponent. Dr. Bechly is now leading the charge with an ID 3.0 research initiative, teamed with population geneticist Ola Hössjer and biologists Richard Sternberg and Ann Gauger. Meyer explains more. Read More ›
Conference on Engineering in Living Systems

Conference on Engineering in Living Systems

We are pleased to announce the Conference on Engineering in Living Systems (CELS 2020) to be held in spring 2020 at Biola University. CELS 2020 brings together leading engineers and biologists in order to: (1) apply engineering principles to better understand biological systems, (2) craft a design-based theoretical framework that explains and predicts the behaviors of living systems, and (3) Read More ›

Photo by John Moeses Bauan

Christopher Rufo Featured in WORLD Magazine Story on Tiny Houses

Seattle plans to stop funding another tiny house village for the homeless after months of fighting with the property’s managers. It will be the second time the city has closed down a tiny house development. Northlake Village, one of nine tiny house villages the city has built since 2015, opened in March 2018. A nonprofit group called the Low Income Housing Institute (LIHI) managed it and subcontracted with Nickelsville, an activist organization of homeless and formerly homeless people. Sharon Lee, LIHI executive director, said Nickelsville did not make residents look for permanent housing or work with a case manager. They also used evictions “arbitrarily and unjustly made people homeless again,” Lee said. Tension grew, and in April, Nickelsville refused to allow LIHI or city staff on the property. They closed the gates with padlocks and posted signs telling the residents working security to keep LIHI or city staff out. In September, the city gave LIHI an Oct. 7 deadline to enroll residents in the city’s Homeless Management Information System. LIHI failed to comply, blaming Nickelsville for not cooperating. Read More ›