Articles

How C. S. Lewis Defends The Dark Tower

In 1997 a concerned inquirer wrote innocently to a Lewis estate employee, “I’m sure you are aware of the petition being circulated by the Discovery Institute at http.//www.discovery.org/lewis/petition.htm” In the exchange that followed, she received the following claims: “I have never heard of such a petition nor indeed of the URL that you quote.” “Ahh, perhaps you refer to the Read More ›

Kilnswatch: Early History of the Kilns Property

According to an Ordnance Survey Map of 1880, the Kilns property included a large clay pit from which clay was dug for processing in the two brick kilns that stood nearby, flanked by a very small house for the brickworker. There would also have been a roofed, open-sided shed for drying the bricks before firing them. The two cone-shaped brick Read More ›

The Kind of Business that Is Nobody’s Business

Douglas Gresham became Honorary Vice Chairman of the Kilns Restoration Committee of Endorsement in 1989. Steve Schofield soon asked Doug whether — as co-heir to Lewis’s literary estate — he was donating any of his windfall to the cause. Steve published Doug’s answer in the spring 1990 issue of the Canadian C. S. Lewis Journal. “As to whether or not Read More ›

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York shambles sunset
Licensed from Adobe Stock

Review of Huxley: From Devil’s Disciple to Evolution’s High Priest by Adrian Desmond (Addison Wesley)

Darth Vader was a thoroughly bad man, destroying planets, kidnapping princesses, and such. That’s the way it should be-we like our movie villains uncomplicated. Mr. Vader’s only virtue was in begetting Luke Skywalker, and in the finale, after we had hissed for a few hours, that relationship was enough to redeem him. Yet what if the opening scenes of Star Read More ›

Soaring to New Heights of Irritation

A cliché among airline flight attendants describes half their job as “taking people’s garbage and saying thank-you.” And so it seems with American civilization today. Politicians, athletes, entertainers, intellectuals, media, activists, business people: We take their garbage and we say thank-you . . . and often pay for the privilege. That resemblance points toward other similarities. Indeed, perhaps nothing captures Read More ›

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Photo from Pixabay via Pexels (CC0 License)

Was There a Big Bang?

Science is a congeries of great quests, and cosmology is the grandest of the great quests. Taking as its province the universe as a whole, cosmology addresses the old, the ineradicable questions about space and time, nature and destiny. It is not a subject for the tame or the timid. For the first half of the 20th century, cosmology remained Read More ›

The Scientifically Correct Book Review of Phillip Johnson’s Darwin on Trial

Publicity of “political correctness” (PC) on the nation’s campuses has alarmed many within and beyond academia. Attempts to silence students and faculty who defy campus ideological fashion have raised questions about the extent to which universities remain havens of free inquiry. Yet to date concern about PC has centered primarily upon the humanities and the social sciences where ideological uniformity Read More ›

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Young male teacher paleontologist in the classroom
Young male teacher paleontologist in the classroom

Natural Selection Found in Report on Science Education

Science teaching, and the teaching of evolution in particular, continue to be a flashpoint in American education. Hoping to correct the problem, the Thomas B. Fordham Foundation just released a report (with the American Association for the Advancement of Science), “Good Science, Bad Science: Teaching Evolution in the States.” Written by Lawrence Lerner, the report recommends increased emphasis in America’s Read More ›

Commentary: Cascadia’s future in the spotlight

September 25, 2000 By JIM TORREYand SUSAN CASTILLOTHIS WEEK, leaders from the Pacific Northwest will gather in Eugene to share economic and environmental strategies. How can we help our economy and our communities thrive in an increasing global world? How can we link high speed rail, revitalized downtowns, trade and tourism corridors, and environmental efforts to improve our quality of Read More ›

Commentary: Cascadia’s future in the spotlight

On Tuesday, we will be welcoming delegates for this year's Cascadia Conference, organized by the Cascadia Project, a nonprofit alliance of communities in Oregon, Washington and British Columbia. Delegates from Eugene, Seattle, Portland, Vancouver, B.C., and other cities will spend two days in workshops with their counterparts from rural communities. In partnership with the University of Oregon, we are looking forward to showcasing our city and county as a national model for "green communities." Panels and workshops will include: High speed rail: A high-speed passenger rail system linking Eugene/Springfield to Vancouver, B.C., and relieving pressure on Interstate 5 is a pivotal project to achieving the Cascadia vision. Delegates will hear from Amtrak West CEO Gil Mallery about the $10 billion High Speed Rail Investment Act...The federal bill could result in more than $500 million in new track improvements, improving the travel times of both passenger and freight rail, and enhanced rail crossings for safer and improved pedestrian access...The local success of the Amtrak Cascades service, which links Eugene, Portland and Seattle, continues, and we've seen continued ridership increases and positive customer satisfaction.

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