telecommuting

Man teleworking from home after coronavirus pandemic
Man working from home and worried about covid-19 coronavirus

Five Possibly Unexpected Ways the Post-COVID Office Will Change

Some managers worry that remote employees will not be productive. They don’t always consider that the remote worker is the person in charge if something affects her work. For example, in an office building, if the water is shut off due to a street repair, a manager would likely co-ordinate. But at home, the worker must decide for herself how best to deal with it, while remaining productive. A level playing field would recognize overall long-term output vs. costs in either case. Read More ›
Group Friends Video Chat Connection Concept
Group Friends Video Chat Connection Concept

We Will Never Go Back to the Pre-COVID-19 Workplace

While many people (myself included) have railed against the excesses of technology and its tendency to weaken community spirit and understanding, it turns out that, in the present crisis, it is having the opposite effect. We are all stuck in our houses for the next several weeks. However, thanks to our new digital infrastructure, we aren’t really alone in the same way any more. Read More ›

Cascadia Blog Article Highlights Teleworking Green, Productivity Benefits

This article, published by TMCnet.com, mentions the Cascadia Center of Discovery Institute: The Cascadia Center which works on regional transportation and sustainable development issues for the Discovery Institute, has taken a strong interest in telework. The rest of the article can be found here.

How To Pay For The Roads Still Traveled

I had a telling conversation with an old friend several months ago, a devoted environmentalist who’s a community college biology teacher living south of San Francisco in a pleasant small town abutting the Pacific. I don’t recall how it came up, but she declared, “We’ve just got to get more people out of their cars.” Then came a pregnant pause, Read More ›

Can Telecommuting Take Root In Kitsap?

This article, published by the Kitsap Sun, mentions Discovery Institute Fellow Bruce Agnew: Bruce Agnew, Director of the Seattle-based Discovery Institute’s Cascadia Center said telework is experiencing a resurgence of interest, and can be part of a larger effort to reduce traffic and carbon emissions that includes effective mass transit, peak-hour tolls and ride-sharing. The rest of the article can Read More ›

Hurray For Transit, But It’s No Silver Bullet

With U.S. gas prices blowing through the roof, transit ridership is growing along with enthusiasm for green vehicles that will run on electricity and liquid fuels, a.k.a. plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, or PHEVs. Cascadia Center has championed expanded transit for Central Puget Sound through proposals for an Eastside commuter rail line adjoining a walking and biking path, and regional passenger-only Read More ›

Slow But Steady “Telework Revolution” Eyed

The nation and major urban regions within the West Coast Corridor of Cascadia and California – namely Vancouver, Seattle, Portland, Los Angeles, San Francisco and San Diego – continue to grapple with costly road and transit projects and the threat of global warming. These stem in part from workforce and population increases. Against this backdrop, common-sense trip reduction strategies such Read More ›