Bruce Chapman

Bringing a Turbulent Land Into Focus

Editor’s Note: The following is a review of In the Red Zone by Steven Vincent (Spence) We’ve all heard of the Green Zone, the heavily fortified district in Baghdad where the American embassy is housed and all manner of diplomats, aid-workers and support-staffers live and go about their busy days, assuming the fortifications hold firm. But what about everything outside Read More ›

Liberation Online

Original Article Basking in the sun by the Al Hamra Hotel swimming pool, a Spanish journalist complained to me that “all my editors want is blood, blood, blood. No context. No politics.” Such editors are cruising to be scooped by such local Iraqi blogs as Iraq the Model, which last summer debunked a Los Angeles Times story on the departure Read More ›

Underground Transit Hub Plan Surfaces for Downtown Seattle

When the big-picture types at the Discovery Institute think about Seattle’s future, they see a subterranean, multi-modal transit center under Benaroya Hall. The dream is to connect light rail, commuter rail, monorail, buses and ferries at Second Avenue and University Street. Welcome to the Mid-Town Transit Hub. On the hub’s lowest level, commuters could catch Sounder trains traveling in the Read More ›

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US soldiers giving salute
Licensed from Adobe Stock

A Bad Idea Whose Time Is Past

Bruce Chapman, former director of the U.S. Census Bureau, deputy assistant to President Ronald Reagan, and U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Organizations in Vienna, Austria, has been president of Discovery Institute since 1990. In 1967 he made an early case for an all-volunteer military in The Wrong Man in Uniform (Trident Press of Simon & Schuster). If each woman Read More ›

Congress to Classroom:

A native of New York City, former Washington state Rep. John Miller attributes his relocation to Seattle to a fourth-grade geography book. In the book, there was a page on each section of the country, recalled Miller. The page on the Puget Sound showed a picture of trees with misty rain coming down. The paragraph on the Puget Sound area Read More ›

Rail-Lovers Determined Service Will Survive

SEATTLE — There’s an unusual coalition of train lovers here determined to ensure at least some passenger rail survives along the American West Coast even if Amtrak dies. What is interesting for British Columbians is that some of the strongest proponents of passenger rail on the U.S. West Coast are trying to “internationalize” the rail corridor. They want fast, efficient Read More ›

Demonstrators Give Birth to Brand New Left

The satirist Tom Wolfe coined the term “radical chic” to characterize the way certain stylish New Yorkers in the 1960s fawned over, and financed, law-breaking groups like the Black Panthers. Just as the New Left attempted a “baby-boomer” imitation of real revolutionaries from still earlier eras, something like a Brand New Left is attempting to be born during the World Read More ›

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Conference photo audience and speakers giving speech. Seminar presenters on a panel during forum. Corporate managers in sales executive training discussion on stage. Investor pitch presentation.
Licensed from Adobe Stock

The Evolution Wars

The conference “Science and Evidence for Design in the Universe,” sponsored by the Wethersfield Institute, was held at the great hall of Cooper Union, in Manhattan. On the walls were photographs of presidents from Lincoln to Clinton in mid oration. The featured speakers on this occasion were less well known; Mike Behe, William Dembski, Stephen Meyer. All have been traveling Read More ›

The ‘Soft Tyranny’ of Hidden Taxation

THE issues of scandals, term limits, Haiti, Iraq and crime dominate the news and TV ads this campaign season. However something deeper and mostly unarticulated may be doing more to shape the nation's politics. The decisive issue of 1994 could well be people's continuing frustration over their inability to get ahead financially - and their conviction that government is both directly and indirectly hampering them. The large, increasingly middle-aged middle class finds salary increases scarce and restructuring layoffs common. If these are prosperous times, people wonder, what will the next recession bring? With many ordinary families turning over to government at various levels almost half their incomes (roughly 25 percent federal income tax, 15.3 percent Social Security, 8 percent state and local sales tax, plus property taxes and assorted special taxes and fees), it becomes harder and harder for the baby boomers who have so shaped political trends in the past to see how they can afford to send their children to college or save adequately for retirement. Polls show that voters no longer are impressed by politicians' offers to satisfy their personal concerns with still more government programs. That is part of the reason why Democrats, as the party that traditionally defends the utility of government action, are in particular trouble this year. Even now-standard efforts by congressional candidates to avoid a negative national trend by "localizing" campaigns may backfire. Localizing usually means showing how the incumbent can "bring home the bacon." But as voters watch television accounts of this going on all over the country - Sen. Ted Kennedy holding up giant posters of federal checks he is delivering to particular constituencies and Speaker Tom Foley boasting of road contracts and police positions brought to Spokane - they see that it is they who are paying for all that bacon and that the price is too high. Yesterday's bacon is becoming today's pork. Read More ›