Economics

Center on Wealth & Poverty

Life after capitalism

Life After Capitalism

Author of national bestseller Life After Google and generation-defining Wealth and Poverty, venture capitalist, futurist, and pioneering thinker extraordinaire George Gilder pinpoints how the clash of creativity with power at the heart of economic systems leads to global cognitive dissonance and argues that the creation of the novel taps capitalism’s infinite promise and is humanity’s only path of escape from stagnation and tyranny. Gilder Read More ›

Chinese Yuan and US dollars on the map of China. Trade war between US and China, economic sanctions

The Final Chinafication of the United States

Even if the United States wanted to wean itself from China for national security reasons it would remain dependent on key minerals for its energy and transportation systems, and this time the dependency will be with one country—China. As the Institute for Energy Research reports, the advancement of the Green New Deal will mean further ‘Chinafication’ of the U.S.  Read More ›
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San Francisco Cable Cars on California Street at sunrise, California, USA
Photo licensed via Adobe Stock

San Francisco Does Detroit

Years from now, when downtown feels like Detroit, San Franciscans will look at the closure of Nordstrom’s downtown store as the day the music died. Read More ›
jonathan-choe-street-scaled

Journalist and Discovery Institute Senior Fellow, Jonathan Choe, Nominated For Four Emmy Awards

Discovery Institute is pleased to announce that Jonathan Choe, Senior Fellow at the Center on Wealth and Poverty’s Fix Homelessness Initiative, has been nominated for four Emmy Awards by the Northwest chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. Read More ›
Gavel leaning against a row of law books

A Return to Soft on Crime?

A California Senate committee recently passed Senate Bill 94, which would allow inmates sentenced to death or life without parole to apply for a "second look" at their cases. If it becomes law, the worst offenders could walk free after they've served 20 years or more. Read More ›