military

american-flags-on-tombs-of-american-veterans-on-memorial-day-zachary-taylor-national-cemetery-louisville-kentucky-blur-effecton-national-register-of-historic-places-stockpack-adobe-stock
American flags on tombs of American Veterans on Memorial Day, Zachary Taylor National Cemetery, Louisville, Kentucky (Blur Effect)On National Register of Historic Places
American flags on tombs of American Veterans on Memorial Day, Zachary Taylor National Cemetery, Louisville, Kentucky (Blur Effect)On National Register of Historic Places

By Keeping The Past Alive, Memorial Day Can Help Us Save The Future

Memorial Day is a profound American holiday because it connects the present with so many different points of our past. It was originally known as Decoration Day, a day set aside to honor those who lost their lives in the Civil War—America’s most costly war, taking the lives of at least 620,000 men. Among American holidays, Memorial Day is unique also in that it originated from the vanquished, not the victor. Read More ›
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Congressman Tom Cotton of Arkansas speaking at the 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Maryland.
Photo by Gage Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Senator Cotton’s Stand

Arkansas Senator Tom Cotton introduced legislation to ban critical race theory trainings in the United States military. The bill is concise, and desperately needed. Read More ›

George Washington’s Tear-Jerker

Civilian control of the military is a cherished principle in American government. It was President Obama who decided to increase our involvement in Afghanistan, and it is Congress that will decide whether to appropriate the money to carry out his decision. It is the president and Congress, not the military, that will decide whether our laws should be changed to allow gays and lesbians to serve in our armed forces. The military advises, but the civilian leadership decides. Yet if not for the actions of George Washington, whose birthday we celebrate, sort of, this month, America might have moved in a very different direction. In early 1783, with Revolutionary War victory in sight but peace uncertain, Washington and the Continental Read More ›

Draft Rumor Targets Supposedly Gullible College Students, Says Volunteer Military Advocate

SEATTLE, OCT. 22 — “The most potent campaign rumor of the year is the web-induced claim that if re-elected Bush President will reinstitute the draft,” says Bruce Chapman, president of the Discovery Institute and a pioneer in the 1960s movement to institute an all-volunteer military. “It’s potent, but it is also false.” “Whether the Kerry camp originated the story or simply Read More ›

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US soldiers giving salute
Licensed from Adobe Stock

A Bad Idea Whose Time Is Past

Bruce Chapman, former director of the U.S. Census Bureau, deputy assistant to President Ronald Reagan, and U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Organizations in Vienna, Austria, has been president of Discovery Institute since 1990. In 1967 he made an early case for an all-volunteer military in The Wrong Man in Uniform (Trident Press of Simon & Schuster). If each woman Read More ›

Tribunals are American Way

This war is full of surprises. And among the strangest so far has been the reaction to President Bush’s decision to establish military tribunals to try certain terrorist suspects. To our knowledge, none have so far been held. Procedures are still being worked out by a Defense Department that regards the assignment with considerably less than total enthusiasm. Only suspects Read More ›