homelessness

desperate-lonely-man-seated-against-the-wall-in-the-city-street-stockpack-adobe-stock
Desperate lonely man seated against the wall in the city street
Photo licensed via Adobe Stock

Homeless Encampments and Mental Illness

Fifty-one years ago I bicycled from Boston to Oregon. I was a Marxist then and looking for evidence of the American empire falling apart, but during the whole ten weeks on the road I didn’t see the one tourist attraction that would have delighted my propagandistic self: homeless encampments. Now every city seems to have them. Read More ›
Community First Village

A Look at Community First! Village in Austin Pt. 2

I wrote last week about Community First! Village, located on relatively cheap land just east of Austin and getting national applause as the coolest homelessness project in what some call America’s coolest city. There’s plenty of hype in both characterizations, especially since many laudatory magazine articles focus on the tiny homes at CFV that draw admiring eyes, and not the dramas occurring within them. Read More ›
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USA, social shortcomings
USA, social shortcomings

Like a Dystopia, Only California

The squalor that haunts the underpasses and back alleys of California should move the state’s progressives to embrace even more law enforcement. Or they can let the state get even more dangerous. Read More ›
Poor homeless man or refugee sleeping on the wooden bench on the

Republicans Could Lead on Mental Health Treatment

Tucked away in the gun law President Biden just signed is a provision increasing funding for preventive outpatient treatment for mental illness. This is an important step toward solving America’s mental-health crisis but only part of what’s needed. Read More ›
homeless-in-san-francisco-sheltering-in-place-during-the-covid-19-pandemic-stockpack-adobe-stock
Homeless in San Francisco sheltering in place during the COVID-19 pandemic
Photo licensed via Adobe Stock

Do Homeless Lives Matter? Nine Fatal Minutes, Two Years Later

Today’s police are trained not to take chances, said one retired SFPD who was on the force for 30 years: “Officers are now primarily reactive; there is very little of the self-initiated activity that was once common, appropriate and encouraged. They have become risk-averse, disinclined to go hands-on with suspects. This is a factor in the bigger picture of what is going on in American policing.” Read More ›