Topic

common ancestry

Theory of Convergent Evolution Analyzed

The knifefish, rather than having several fins like a trout, has one long “ribbon fin” that undulates along the length of its body. Studies of its motion reveal that it uses the optimal wavelength to get the most forward thrust, stability, and maneuverability out of its investment of energy. But the knifefish is not alone: the same optimal design can be found in cuttlefish (cephalopods), rays (cartilaginous fish), certain flatworms, and other bony fish that are evolutionarily unrelated. Read More ›

The spark of life, abstract fractal render for topics such as biology, evolution

The Top Ten Scientific Problems with Biological and Chemical Evolution

Is it true that there are "no weaknesses" in evolutionary theory? All one must do is examine the technical scientific literature and inquire whether there are legitimate scientific challenges to chemical and biological evolution. This article reviews some of this literature and the scientific challenges to Darwinian theory and chemical evolution therein. Read More ›

Douglas Axe co-author of Science & Human Origins

Apes can’t read, so why can we? Does science show we’re related to apes, or is the evolutionary tale of common ancestry false?

Science & Human Origins, the provocative new book from Discovery Institute Press, boldly addresses some of the most popular evolutionary arguments pertaining to controversial claims that humans and apes are related through common ancestry. Read More ›

Sample collection and study of the skeleton of a monkey
Sample collection and study of the skeleton of a monkey, and animals.

What ‘Ida’ Give for a Missing Link

As a follower of the evolution debate, I love it when new “missing links” are found. Not only does the media plunge headfirst into a crusade for Darwin, but suspiciously, it is only after unveiling the breakthrough that evolutionary biologists admit how precious little evidence they previously held for the evolutionary transition in question. Take the recent media coverage of Read More ›

Photo by Tadeusz Lakota

Barking Up the Wrong Tree

Upon learning of an employee’s defection to a rival company, one prominent CEO launched a chair across the room. Commenting on the incident in the Washington Post, eminent primatologist Frans de Waal noted that the CEO acted like an ape. But de Waal (and the Post for that matter) wasn’t kidding; he took this incident as further proof of common Read More ›

Icons-of-Evolution

Icons of Evolution

Authored by developmental biologist and Senior Discovery Fellow Jonathan Wells, this book takes aim at 10 common “icons” used to bolster Darwin’s theory in widely used biology textbooks. The “icons” commonly cited to support evolution in textbooks turn out to be scientific urban legends, long-refuted fakes, or misrepresentations of the scientific data. One of the most famous “icons” discussed is Read More ›

Berkeley-Law-Cardozo-quote2
Quote by Benjamin Cardozo on Berkeley Law School
You will study the wisdom of the past, for in a wilderness of conflicting counsels, a trail has there been blazed. You will study the life of mankind, for this is the life you must order, and, to order with wisdom, must know. You will study the precepts of justice, for these are the truths that through you shall come to their hour of triumph. Here is the high emprise, the fine endeavor, the splendid possibility of achievement, to which I summon you and bid you welcome.
Quote by Benjamin Cardozo on Berkeley Law School

On Open Minded Research

Some critics have accused Jonathan Wells of being biased in pursuing his Ph.D. in biology from the University of California at Berkeley. As a result, these critics charge, his arguments against Darwinism are false and should not be seriously considered. Read More ›

Homology:

Before Darwin, homology was defined morphologically and explained by reference to ideal archetypes -- that is, to intelligent design. Darwin reformulated biology in naturalistic* rather than teleological terms, and explained homology as the result of descent with modification from a common ancestor. Descent with modification, however, renders design unnecessary only if it is due entirely tonaturalistic mechanisms. Two such mechanisms have been proposed, genetic programs and developmental pathways, but neither one fits the evidence. Without an empirically demonstrated naturalistic mechanism to account for homology, design remains a possibility which can only be excluded on the basis of questionable philosophical assumptions. * In this article, "naturalism" and "naturalistic" refer to the philosophical doctrine that nature is the whole of reality, and that intelligent causation does not qualify as a scientific explanation. Read More ›