crime

Close-up of a thief wearing balaclava breaking car window with c
Close-up of a thief wearing balaclava breaking car window with crowbar. Car thief, car theft concept

Crime Reform Is Here. Do You Feel Safer?

Democrats are keeping their heads down. They spent years assuring the public that their so-called fixes would enhance public safety, that they were simply out to protect nonviolent offenders from overzealous law enforcement. Now I have to ask voters in blue cities and states: Do you feel safer? Read More ›
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close up of addict woman and drug syringes
close up of addict woman and drug syringes

The Real Zombie Apocalypse

The likelihood of a zombie apocalypse like the ones portrayed in movies and TV shows is slim to say the least, but in the slums of some of America's largest cities, it seems the apocalypse is already upon us. Only it's not a virus or a curse turning people into walking shells of their former selves – it's drug addiction. Read More ›
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Two police officers arrest and handcuff homeless woman in Venice Beach, Los Angeles, California.
Two police officers arrest and handcuff homeless woman in Venice Beach, Los Angeles, California.

How Leftist Prosecutors Contributed To 2020’s Massive Crime Spike

The number of homicides in the United States increased around 30 percent in 2020 compared to the previous year, the Federal Bureau of Investigation reported last week, along with a 5.6 percent increase in violent crime in the same period. Read More ›
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The New Untouchables

The poor, in the logic of Seattle’s progressive elites, are thus forced to commit crimes — including violent crimes — to secure their very existence. Therefore, as society is the perpetrator of this inequality, the crimes of the poor must be forgiven. Read More ›
Homeless-on-Bench

An Addiction Crisis Disguised as a Housing Crisis

By latest count, some 109,089 men and women are sleeping on the streets of major cities in California, Oregon, and Washington. The homelessness crisis in these cities has generated headlines and speculation about “root causes.” Progressive political activists allege that tech companies have inflated housing costs and forced middle-class people onto the streets. Declaring that “no two people living on Skid Row . . . ended up there for the same reasons,” Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti, for his part, blames a housing shortage, stagnant wages, cuts to mental health services, domestic and sexual abuse, shortcomings in criminal justice, and a lack of resources for veterans. These factors may all have played a role, but the most pervasive cause of West Coast homelessness is clear: heroin, fentanyl, and synthetic opioids. Read More ›