book review

Monkeys gazing at each other
Monkeys gazing at each other
Photo by Sophie Dale at Unsplash

The Politically Incorrect Guide to Darwinism and Intelligent Design

If you want a book full of fascinating anecdotes and straight-talk about the debate over Darwinism and intelligent design, written by a credentialed biologist with enjoyable writing skills, this truly is the book for you. Read More ›
Photo by Johannes Plenio

Review of The Mystery of Life’s Origin

A seminal work for the theory of intelligent design, this book provides a scientific critique of the prevailing paradigmatic theories of chemical evolution. The authors include Discovery fellows Charles Thaxton and Walter Bradley, and they conclude that the prebiotic soup from which the first cell supposedly arose is a myth. The Miller-Urey experiments employed an unrealistic gas mixture, and there Read More ›

Bringing a Turbulent Land Into Focus

Editor’s Note: The following is a review of In the Red Zone by Steven Vincent (Spence) We’ve all heard of the Green Zone, the heavily fortified district in Baghdad where the American embassy is housed and all manner of diplomats, aid-workers and support-staffers live and go about their busy days, assuming the fortifications hold firm. But what about everything outside Read More ›

The Misanthropes

Consumer’s Guide to aBrave New World,by Wesley J. Smith(Encounter, 219 pp., $25.95) Leo Strauss found it telling that Machiavelli mentioned only one other figure who served as the teacher of princes, the office that Machiavelli was claiming for himself. And that was Chiron the centaur, who was aptly constituted to be a tutor of princes because he was half man, Read More ›

Getting Rid of the Unfair Rules

The Battle of Beginnings: Why Neither Side is Winning the Creation-Evolution Debate by Del RatzschDowner’s Grove, Illinois: InterVarsity Press, 1996, 248 pp. The casual reader of Del Ratzsch’s The Battle of Beginnings: Why Neither Side is Winning the Creation-Evolution Debate (hereafter, Battle) may be excused for casting Ratzsch in the role of a philosophical and scientific referee — perhaps even Read More ›

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Crossword puzzle and pencil
Licensed from Adobe Stock

The Right Questions

The Right Questions is the product of an accomplished scholar who is reflecting upon culture and society in light of his other books which provided an extensive scientific critique of naturalistic theories of origins. In this book, Phillip Johnson, Program Advisor to Discovery Institute’s Center for Science and Culture, asks, “What are the right questions” in topics such as logic, Read More ›

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pre sunrise hike //
Photo by Ahmad Jawed on Unsplash

Against All Terror

The Afghan war drags on. Nobody knows where the next war or terrorist strike will come, or how soon, or how bad it will be. Nobody knows where the defense budget is going, except up, up and away. America remains steadfast. But increasingly, America wants explanations and answers. Enter Against All Terrors: This People’s Next Defense. This is one of Read More ›

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Wings of a butterfly Ulysses. Wings of a butterfly texture background. Butterfly wings ornament.
Licensed from Adobe Stock

What Have Butterflies Got to Do with Darwin?

Review of Bernard d’Abrera, The Concise Atlas of Butterflies of the World (London: Hill House, 2001), 353 pages. Bernard d’Abrera’s concise atlas of the world’s butterflies is a beautifully produced book with the most stunning photographs of butterflies that I’ve ever seen. Though not intended as a coffee-table book, it could eminently serve that purpose. D’Abrera himself is a world-renowned butterfly Read More ›

Darwin’s Black Box: A Review by Ray Bohlin

What do mouse traps, molecular biology, blood clotting, Rube Goldberg machines, and irreducible complexity have to do with each other? At first glance they seem to have little if anything to do with each other. However, they are all part of a recent book by Free Press titled, Darwin’s Black Box: The Biochemical Challenge to Evolution by Michael Behe. Michael Behe is Read More ›

Review God After Darwin: A Theology of Evolution by John Haught

I suppose it's the residual effect of original sin, but I enjoy reviewing books I disagree with more than ones I agree with. After all, who wants to spend 1500 words inventing new ways of saying "me, too" and "yes, that's right"? Much better to bring a contrasting view to the author's work, focus on areas of difference, and enjoy the simple pleasures of controversy. So, since I had heard he was skeptical of a theory of intelligent design in biology — of which I am an advocate — I looked forward to reviewing Georgetown theologian John Haught's God After Darwin: A Theology of Evolution. What a disappointment! Looking back over my margin notes for this elegantly written book, I find I have scribbled on various pages: "Great!"; "I agree"; "!"; "interesting"; "Hmm"; and four "Good"s in a row. Read More ›