Cascadia

The Cascadia Center

To Succeed, Seattle Should Share the Olympics

The Seattle Bid Committe that is spearheading the drive to bring the Olympics to Seattle and the Northwest in 2008 has entered a new, post-Atlanta phase. First, the organizational effort is about to be intensified. Entrepreneur Clark Kokich will operate as chairman of the committee, and internationally known events impressario Bob Walsh will lead planning, as before. But to provide Read More ›

aerial-view-lummi-island-washington.jpg
Sunset Aerial View of Rural Lummi Island, Washington. Located in the Puget Sound area of Washington state this rural island offers a peaceful retreat and boasts the famous award winning Willows Inn.
Licensed from Adobe Stock

State’s Growing Tourism Industry Offers Employment Promise

These are heady times for entrepreneurs, high tech whizzes and international traders. But many people are left out of the boom, including bank tellers and telephone operators, middle managers and others whose jobs are being rendered obsolete by new technologies, corporate down-sizing and international competition. They can get jobs in this economy, but often not at levels commensurate with their Read More ›

For Canada, Breaking Up is A Hard – And Wrong – Thing To Do

Canada is a country where something terrible is always just about to happen, but never does. The terrible thing is usually the secession of Quebec. The mere possibility of a province seceding reminds a U.S. citizen of the relative stability bequeathed to our country by the Union victory in the Civil War. But hardly anything disturbs the political calm like breaking up one's country. And in Canada, that is a real possibility. Like Sisyphus, Canada seems condemned to roll the rock of Quebec up the hill of federalism, only to have it roll back down, over and over. Worse, federalist forces have to win every election that is held on the issue, while secessionists need only win once. Probably. You can't say for sure because, in Canada, referenda often settle even less than they do here. If Quebeckers next Monday vote for "sovereignty," it is still unclear what that will mean in practice. Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien says it means separation, clear and simple. No more Canadian passports for Quebeckers. A division of the national debt, and no special favors thereafter. The federalists also are likely to back the Cree Indian Grand Chief, Matthew Coon Come, who wants his tribe's huge northern tracts in Quebec to remain in Canada. The chief argues that aboriginals (as native peoples are known) have the same right to secede from Quebec that Quebec demands from Canada. Read More ›