No Free Lunch

No-Free-Lunch-Bill-Dembski
Book cover of No Free Lunch by William A. Dembski

No Free Lunch

No Free Lunch, the sequel to mathematician and philosopher William Dembski's Cambridge University Press book The Design Inference, explores key questions about the origin of specified complexity. Dembski explains that the Darwinian search mechanism of random mutation coupled with natural selection is incapable of generating novel complex, specified information (CSI).

This observation translates into "No Free Lunch" (NFL) theorems, which Dembski explains are inherent constraints upon natural systems. Natural Darwinian mechanisms can shuffle this information around, but only intelligence can generate novel CSI. In other words, when it comes to generating truly novel biological complexity, Darwin can have no free lunch...

Read More ›
eco-friendly-bamboo-kitchenware-with-paper-mug-and-plate-on-green-background-zero-waste-plastic-free-concept-sustainable-lifestyle-flat-lay-top-view-stockpack-adobe-stock.jpg
Eco friendly bamboo kitchenware with paper mug and plate on green background. Zero waste, plastic free concept. Sustainable lifestyle. Flat lay, top view.

Naturalism’s Argument from Invincible Ignorance

Howard Van Till’s review of my book No Free Lunch exemplifies perfectly why theistic evolution remains intelligent design’s most implacable foe. Not only does theistic evolution sign off on the naturalism that pervades so much of contemporary science, but it justifies that naturalism theologically — as though it were unworthy of God to create by any means other than an evolutionary process that carefully conceals God’s tracks. Read More ›
Abstract 3d rendering futuristic dots and lines. computer geometric digital connection structure. Visual information complexity. Intricate data threads plot. Intelligence artificial

Refuted Yet Again!

This article is written in response to Matt Young’s “How to Evolve Specified Complexity by Natural Means” which appeared in Metanexus. The mathematician George Polya used to quip that if you can’t solve a problem, find an easier problem and solve it. Matt Young seems to have taken Polya’s advice to heart. Young has taken Shannon’s tried-and-true theory of information Read More ›