information theory

Relation to Previous Work

Conversations with William Dembski – Being as Communion in Relation to Previous Work

In this clip, William Dembski describes how his new book Being as Communion fits with the other books he has written. In Being as Communion Dembski creates a metaphysical backdrop or worldview that challenges the traditional materialistic framework, therefore adding context to his previous work.

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Conversations with William Dembski – The Meaning of Information

In this clip, Dr. Dembski discusses the meaning of information. Dembski defines information as the “ruling out of possibilities.” By ruling a range of possibilities, you learn something. You can do science with this because you can start applying probabilities and measuring information.

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A Fact Most People Don’t Know About William Dembski

In this clip we learn that Dr. William Dembski received his high school diploma after having received his PhD. Watch the video to hear the story. To Learn more about William Dembski, or his new book Being As Communion, visit www.beingascommunion.com.

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Meyer Responds to Critics: Marshall, Part 3

Stephen Meyer discusses his radio debate with Charles Marshall. The debate was very substantive and addressed a number of topics related to the Cambrian explosion including the validity of self-organizational processes as an explanation for the Cambrian explosion. For more information about Stephen Meyer and his New York Times bestseller Darwin’s Doubt, visit www.DarwinsDoubt.com.

The Thesis of Being as Communion

Conversations with William Dembski–The Thesis of Being as Communion

In this video Dr. William Dembski describes the central thesis of his new book Being as Communion. Dembski proposes that the fundamental “stuff” of this universe is information, not matter. Listen to Dembski discuss the nature of reality, relational ontology, the creation of information, and more. Being as Communion is a title that I came up with as I was Read More ›

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Make a Wish
Photo by Erik Brolin at Unsplash

Surprise and Creativity

Why in the world do we need yet another “new” economics? Jamming the libraries and the bookstores of the world are avatars of what must be every variation on the great themes of market and managerial economics. Scores of Nobel Prizes have been awarded for various nugatory refinements of the prevailing ideas. All these schemes, however, fail to answer the Read More ›

Conservation of Information in Search

Abstract: Conservation of information theorems indicate that any search algorithm performs, on average, as well as random search without replacement unless it takes advantage of problem-specific information about the search target or the search-space structure. Combinatorics shows that even a moderately sized search requires problem-specific information to be successful. Computers, despite their speed in performing queries, are completely inadequate for resolving even moderately sized search problems without accurate information to guide them. We propose three measures to characterize the information required for successful search: 1) endogenous information, which measures the difficulty of finding a target using random search; 2) exogenous information, which measures the difficulty that remains in finding a target once a search takes advantage of problem-specific information; and 3) active information, which, as the difference between endogenous and exogenous information, measures the contribution of problem-specific information for successfully finding a target. This paper develops a methodology based on these information measures to gauge the effectiveness with which problem-specific information facilitates successful search. It then applies this methodology to various search tools widely used in evolutionary search.

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A Response to Dr. Dawkins’ “The Information Challenge”

In September, 2007, I posted a link to a YouTube video where Richard Dawkins was asked to explain the origin of genetic information, according to Darwinism. I also posted a link to Dawkins’ rebuttal to the video, where he purports to explain the origin of genetic information according to Darwinian evolution. The question posed to Dawkins was, “Can you give Read More ›

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A monkey at the Rock of Gibraltar
Photo by Aaron Baw on Unsplash

Evolution and Me

I first became conscious that something was awry in Darwinian science some 40 years ago as I was writing my early critique of sexual liberation, Sexual Suicide (revised and republished as Men and Marriage). At the time, the publishing world was awash with such titles as Desmond Morris’s The Naked Ape and The Human Zoo and Robert Ardrey’s African Genesis, which touted or pruriently probed the animality of Read More ›

Searching Large Spaces

Searching for small targets in large spaces is a common problem in the sciences. Because blind search is inadequate for such searches, it needs to be supplemented with additional information, thereby transforming a blind search into an assisted search. This additional information can be quantified and indicates that assisted searches themselves result from searching higher-level search spaces–by conducting, as it were, a search for a search. Thus, the original search gets displaced to a higher-level search. The key result in this paper is a displacement theorem, which shows that successfully resolving such a higher-level search is exponentially more difficult than successfully resolving the original search. Leading up to this result, a measure-theoretic version of the No Free Lunch theorems is formulated and proven. The paper shows that stochastic mechanisms, though able to explain the success of assisted searches in locating targets, cannot, in turn, explain the source of assisted searches. Read More ›