Jonathan Witt

Executive Editor, Discovery Institute Press and Senior Fellow, Center for Science and Culture

Jonathan Witt, PhD, is Executive Editor of Discovery Institute Press and a Senior Fellow with the Center for Science and Culture. His latest book is a YA novel co-authored with astronomer Guillermo Gonzalez, The Farm at the Center of the Universe. Witt also authored Intelligent Design Uncensored (IVP, 2010) with William Dembski, A Meaningful World: How the Arts and Sciences Reveal the Genius of Nature (IVP, 2006) with Benjamin Wiker, and Heretic: One Scientist’s Journey from Darwin to Design (DI Press, 2018) with Finnish bioengineer Matti Leisola.

Additionally, he authored The Hobbit Party: The Vision of Freedom That Tolkien Got, and the West Forgot (Ignatius, 2014) with Jay W. Richards.

Witt served as the lead writer and associate producer for Poverty, Inc.winner of the $100,000 Templeton Freedom Award and recipient of over 50 international film festival honors.

He also scripted three other documentaries that aired widely on PBS and were translated into multiple languages for airing in countries around the globe: The Privileged Planet (written with Lad Allen), The Birth of Freedom, and The Call of the Entrepreneur.

He scripted two DVD curricula carried by Zondervan, including Effective Stewardship, and he served as the lead writer for The PovertyCure DVD Series and the PovertyCure initiative, which includes a content-rich website, more than a million Facebook followers, and a network of 400+ poverty-fighting organizations from around the world.

Witt has provided editing or deep editing work for several successful books, including three New York Times bestsellers.

Before returning to work full time again with Discovery Institute’s Center for Science and Culture, Witt served as the managing editor for the news and commentary site The Stream, and as a research fellow for the Acton Institute in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Witt’s academic essays have appeared in such periodicals as TouchstoneCrisis MagazinePhilosophia ChristiThe Princeton Theological ReviewThe Flannery O’Connor Bulletin, and Oxford’s Literature and Theology. His opinion pieces have appeared in The Seattle TimesThe Kansas City StarScience & Theology NewsBreakpoint, The StreamThe American Spectator, The Imaginative Conservative and The Federalist.

He has been interviewed by numerous regional and national radio programs, including Janet Parshall’s America, Janet Parshall’s In the Market, Hank Hanegraaff’s Bible Answer Man, Janet Mefferd of the Salem Radio Network, and Family News in Focus. He is a regular annual speaker for Discovery Institute’s summer seminar on science and culture and has spoken at universities on a range of topics connected to political and economic freedom, cultural renewal, and the arts.

Witt previously served as a tenured professor of literature and writing at Lubbock Christian University. He has a PhD, with honors, in English and Literary Theory from the University of Kansas.

Archives

Darwin’s Racism of the Gaps 

A defender of Darwinism might object that it’s silly to ding Darwin for his racism, since just about every white person in Victorian England was racist.

The Farm at the Center of the Universe

Why did Isaac’s father have to die so young? Isaac’s older cousin Charlie — a science teacher — says he knows why. Nature is pitiless. There’s no God. No afterlife. Just atoms in the void and the struggle for survival. Charlie says a week at their grandparents’ farm, seeing animals get killed and eaten, will prove it. But at the farm, both of them get more than they bargained for. And soon Isaac finds himself caught in a battle of wits between two men, and facing a choice he alone can

How the Arts and Sciences Reveal the Genius of Nature

Is the universe meaningful or meaningless? Purposeful or pointless? On this ID The Future, enjoy the second half of an interview with Dr. Jonathan Witt about the evidence of purpose and meaning built into the universe. In the second half of a conversation, Dr. Witt describes four characteristics common in works of human genius and shows that these same hallmarks are also found in the natural world. Don't miss the first half of the interview, available in a previous episode.

A Cosmos Charged With Meaning and Purpose

Nearly 30 years ago, physicist Steven Weinberg wrote that “[t]he more the universe seems comprehensible, the more it also seems pointless.” But is our universe really just a meaningless accident? Or can we detect true genius by studying its workings? On this ID The Future, we are pleased to share the first half of an interview with Dr. Jonathan Witt about the central questions of his 2006 book A Meaningful World, co-written with Benjamin Wiker. Witt explains that the more we learn about the universe, the more it seems laden with meaning. This is Part 1 of a two-part conversation.

How Modern Science Strengthens the Claims of Theism

On this ID The Future, Liberty McArtor, host of the Know Why Podcast, interviews Jonathan Witt on the compatibility of science and faith, both past and present. Witt is Executive Editor at Discovery Institute Press, as well as a Senior Fellow and Senior Project Manager with Discovery Institute's Center for Science & Culture. His latest book, co-written with Finnish bio-engineer Matti Leisola, is Heretic: One Scientist's Journey from Darwin to Design. In his conversation with McArtor, Witt describes the unique time and place that helped inspire the rise of modern science. "They had the Judeo-Christian worldview," Witt notes, "and that fired the imaginations and ordered the reasoning of those that gave birth to the scientific revolution." Witt also reviews some of the abundant scientific discoveries of the last century that are causing even committed materialists to question or reject the neo-Darwinian explanation. The all-too-common assertion that science and faith are at odds with one another is outdated. Listen in to understand just a few of the reasons why! With thanks to Liberty McArtor and the Know Why Podcast for permission to cross-post this interview.