Geoffrey Simmons

Fellow, Center for Science and Culture

Geoffrey Simmons (BS in biology, coursework completed for MS in microbiology, University of Illinois; M.D., University of Illinois Medical School; Internship and Residency in Internal Medicine, LAC-USC Medical Center; Boarded in Internal Medicine since 1974) is a licensed and practicing physician in Eugene, OR, as well as an author and lecturer. President of the American Academy of Disaster Medicine and a member of the Board of Governors of the Sacred Heart Medical Center\'s Emergency Preparedness Committee, he is the author of six novels and of the books What Darwin Didn\'t Know (Harvest Publishers, 2004) which has had ten printings and was translated into Spanish, as well as and Billions of Missing Links (Harvest Publishers, 2007). He has lectured on disaster preparedness on radio and television as well as at many neighborhood associations and high schools, and has been a medical correspondent for KABC in Los Angeles and KUGN in Eugene, a guest on the Steve Allen show, and has made numerous radio appearances related to his writings.

Archives

Coronavirus Response: Design in Nature and Medical Science

On this episode of ID the Future, internal medicine specialist Dr. Geoff Simmons speaks with host Andrew McDiarmid about his recent Evolution News article on the body’s response to the coronavirus, our immune system. It comprises an enormously complex enterprise with adaptive memory for millions of pathogens and the ability to keep on learning more. Researchers study it to learn how to create vaccines for diseases like COVID-19. Their work is one of intelligent design from start to finish. But, Simmons says, we ought to recognize that it starts with studying systems in our bodies that are even more intelligently designed. One might object that if our immune system were intelligently designed, it would be utterly immune to all pathogens, Read More ›

Can Evolution Create Mind? Can We?

On this episode of ID the Future, host Andrew McDiarmid and physician and Discovery Institute fellow Dr. Geoffrey Simmons concludes their three-part conversation about Simmons’ new book Are We Here to Recreate Ourselves? The Convergence of Designs. Our own arrival is impossible to explain through evolution, he says, in view of the incredible complexity of our neurological system, and all that had to develop simultaneously with it.

Dr. Geoffrey Simmons On Human Design — and Re-Creating It in Robots

On this episode of ID the Future, author and physician Geoffrey Simmons joins host Andrew McDiarmid in a wide-ranging discussion of his new book, Are We Here to Re-Create Ourselves: The Convergence of Designs. From the foresight needed in the design of eyes, to our stereoscopic and redundant hearing systems, to the mysteries of design in the nervous and circulatory systems, signs of engineered design are everywhere in the human body.

Geoffrey Simmons on Patterns of Design in Human Life

On this episode of ID the Future, physician Geoffrey Simmons speaks with host Andrew McDiarmid about his new book Are We Here to Recreate Ourselves? The Convergence of Design. There’s a pattern in our re-creating ourselves, Simmons says, even in the artifacts we create, but especially in human reproduction. He sees clues of design in in the processes of reproduction, in development, and in the many complex events in the lungs and vascular system that make childbirth possible. There’s even evidence of intentionality behind aging and death, says Simmons. In sum, Simmons argues, careful observations across many decades have shown that we never see such complex and foresight-rich processes created except by the working of mind or intelligence; it just Read More ›

Foresight in Nature: A Hallmark of Design

On this episode of ID the Future, host Sarah Chaffee speaks with physician and author Dr. Geoffrey Simmons about nature’s foresight. Engineers designing a car have to plan for all kinds of conditions the car might encounter for the car to be successful. Something like this also appears to be necessary for organisms — including the human organism, as Dr. Simmons argues in a recent Evolution News article. Blind natural forces, he argues, don’t have what it takes. Instead it requires real foresight, a hallmark of intelligent design.

Dr. Geoffrey Simmons: The Science of Taste & Smell

On this episode of ID the Future, Dr. Geoffrey Simmons discusses the extraordinary design of the human capacity for taste and smell. Dr. Simmons explains how the processes of taste and smell work, and how the human mouth and nose make a compelling case for intelligent design. For more on this topic, read Dr. Simmons’ book, What Darwin Didn’t Know: A Doctor Dissects the Theory of Evolution.

How We Feel: Geoffrey Simmons on the Sensation of Touch

On this episode of ID the Future, hear from CSC Senior Fellow & physician Geoffrey Simmons as he discusses the design behind the sense of touch. We’re now seeing attempts — such as a DARPA project that seeks to develop a prosthetic hand that can feel — to mimic the natural phenomenon of touch in medical technology. Simmons explains how touch works, and examines the possibility of scientists being able to imitate the design of sensation for technological use.

Billions of Missing Links: A Rational Look at the Mysteries that Evolution Can’t Explain

On this episode of ID The Future CSC’s Casey Luskin interviews Dr. Geoffrey Simmons author of the new book Billions of Missing Links. In the book Simmons shows that as modern science has progressed from the visible to the invisible (microscopic, submicroscopic, genetic, biochemical and genetic) the numbers of missing links have skyrocketed. Every “link” discovered brings many more questions (missing links) than answers.

The Making of a Darwin Dissenter Part II

On this second of a two part ID The Future, CSC’s Casey Luskin continues his discussion with CSC Fellow Dr. Geoffrey Simmons on what makes him skeptical of Darwinian evolution. Dr. Simmons is the author of the forthcoming Billions of Missing Links (2007) and Discovery Institute will host a book release party for him in its Seattle offices on Feb. 16.