Robert Crowther

Robert Crowther holds a BA in Journalism with an emphasis in public affairs and 20 years experience as a journalist, publisher, and brand marketing and media relations specialist. From 1994-2000 he was the Director of Public and Media Relations for Discovery Institute overseeing most aspects of communications for each of the Institute's major programs. In addition to handling public and media relations he managed the Institute's first three books to press, Justice Matters by Roberta Katz, Speaking of George Gilder edited by Frank Gregorsky, and The End of Money by Richard Rahn.

In 2000 he took a position as a brand strategist at Parker LePla in Seattle and helped manage marketing and brand communications for a number of non-profit organizations and corporations including Seattle Children's Home, Wild Tangent, Group Health, Bastyr University, and IDX Technologies.

In 2003 Crowther returned to Discovery Institute to take over as Director of Communications for the Center for Science & Culture. He oversees public and social media relations for the Institute's work on the debate over evolution.

In addition to researching and writing on the debate over evolution, Crowther has written on generational studies and was co-founder, and senior fellow, of the Generational Inquiry Group, a virtual think-tank conducting and disseminating research on political and cultural issues from a generational perspective.

His writing on a number of issues has been published in The Seattle Times, Seattle Post-Intelligencer, The New York Times, Wolrdnetdaily.com, San Angelo Standard Times, Tacoma News Tribune, Whistleblower Magazine, LTM Newsletter, City Magazine, Insight Out, Cityheat, Business Unusual, and Computer Wave. He also twice successfully published his own magazine the first focusing on the intersection of music and culture, and later one looking at technology and culture.

Archives

Neo-Darwinism’s Catch-22: Before Evolving New Features, Organisms Would Be Swamped by Genetic Junk

The article by physicists David Snoke, Jeffery Cox, and Donald Petcher begins by observing that in order to produce a new system, evolution first needs to try lots of new things. It must generate many, many variations upon which natural selection can act in order to “find” something useful to retain. But that comes with a potentially fatal cost. Read the rest at Evolution News & Views.

What’s your function function?

The myth of junk DNA continues to unravel. Almost daily (sometimes twice daily) new peer-reviewed articles are appearing in the scientific literature pointing out the functions of previously believed to be “non-functioning” or junk DNA. CSC’s Research Coordinator Casey Luskin says: “When we look for function, we find it, and when we don’t look for function, someone else finds it.” Read his report at Evolution News & Views.

Real Science vs. Bill Nye the “Science Guy”

Casey Luskin reviews Bill Nye’s latest book, Undeniable: Evolution and the Science of Creation, and finds it underwhelming when compared to another bestseller, Darwin’s Doubt. According to Luskin: “If you think Nye’s ideology is bad, wait until you see the science he uses to justify these claims.” Read more at Evolution News & Views.

Another Successful Prediction of Intelligent Design

Intelligent design theory expects that we should find deeper and deeper layers of function in biology, which by the same token represents a big problem for Darwinian evolution. In the past we’ve noted papers finding function for synonymous codons (for example, see here and here) — but the functions reported in those papers generally pertained to controlling translation speed. Now a paper in the journal Cell has found a new potential function, namely that synonymous codons can control the rate at which mRNA transcripts degrade and are broken down within cells. Casey Luskin reports at Evolution News & Views.

Bogus Assertions

Eric Lane’s comment, “Science classes are for science only” (Your Turn, Monday) makes bold — and bogus — assertions about the current debate over how to teach evolution, and what he imagines might be the reasons for this. Not surprisingly, Lane apparently didn’t bother to do a shred of research. Instead, he was quite satisfied to let his imagination come Read More ›