Robert L.. Crowther, II, Staff - Center for Science and Culture
Staff - Discovery Institute
Discovery Extension: 107
Email: rob@discovery.org
Robert Crowther holds a BA in Journalism with an emphasis in public affairs and twenty years experience as a journalist, publisher, and brand marketing and media relations specialist. From 1994-2000 he was the Director of Public and Media Relations for Discovery Institute overseeing most aspects of communications for each of the Institute's major programs. In addition to handling public and media relations he managed the Institute's first three books to press, Justice Matters by Roberta Katz, Speaking of George Gilder edited by Frank Gregorsky, and The End of Money by Richard Rahn.

In 2000 he took a position as a brand strategist at Parker LePla in Seattle and helped manage marketing and brand communications for a number of non-profit organizations and corporations including Seattle Children's Home, Wild Tangent, Group Health, Bastyr University, and IDX Technologies.

In 2003 Crowther returned to Discovery Institute to take over as Director of Communications for the Center for Science & Culture. He oversees all public and media relations for the Institute's work on the debate over evolution, as well as managing its popular news websites, Evolution News & Views (www.evolutionnews.org) and its podcast ID The Future, (www.idthefuture.com).

In addition to researching and writing on the debate over evolution, Crowther has written on generational studies and was co-founder, and senior fellow, of the Generational Inquiry Group, a virtual think-tank conducting and disseminating research on political and cultural issues from a generational perspective.

His writing on a number of issues has been published in The Seattle Times, Seattle Post-Intelligencer, The New York Times, Wolrdnetdaily.com, San Angelo Standard Times, Tacoma News Tribune, Whistleblower Magazine, LTM Newsletter, City Magazine, Insight Out, Cityheat, Business Unusual, and Computer Wave. He also twice successfully published his own magazine the first focusing on the intersection of music and culture, and later one looking at technology and culture.