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Democracy & Technology Blog Conyers opposing regulation

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John Conyers, Jr.

If broadband providers turn the Internet into a “world where those who pay can play, but those who don’t are simply out of luck,” current antitrust law can solve the problem says House Judiciary Chairman John Conyers, Jr. (D-MI).

I believe that antitrust law is the most appropriate way to deal with this problem — and antitrust law is not regulation. It exists to correct distortions of the free market, where monopolies or cartels have cornered the market, and competition is not being allowed to work. The antitrust laws can help maintain a free and open Internet.

The comment came at a Congressional hearing yesterday. Of course the broadband market isn’t characterized by monopoly or cartel, so I would dispute whether antitrust could be used to prevent broadband providers from experimenting with innovative pricing and network management (and it wouldn’t matter — antitrust law wouldn’t be needed because consumers could take their business elsewhere). But if one believes the market is or soon will become a cartel, Conyer’s assessment should be reassuring.
The Federal Trade Commission staff have expressed the same opinion as Conyers:

The competitive issues raised in the debate over network neutrality regulation are not new to antitrust law, which is well-equipped to analyze potential conduct and business arrangements involving broadband Internet access.

Aside from antitrust law, the Congressional Research Service, among others, concludes that the Federal Communications Commission already has the authority to regulate broadband providers.

[N]either telephone companies nor cable companies, when providing broadband services, are required to adhere to the more stringent regulatory regime for telecommunications services found under Title II (common carrier) of the 1934 Act. However, classification as an information service does not free the service from regulation. The FCC continues to have regulatory authority over information services under its Title I, ancillary jurisdiction. (footnotes omitted)

Conyers acknowledged at the hearing that the Internet has become the “dominant venue for the expression of ideas and public discourse,” as I believe everyone can agree.
But if there’s a risk broadband providers could do something bad does that mean Congress should prohibit everything? Not according to Conyers.

[W]hen it comes to the Internet, we should always proceed cautiously. Unless we have clearly documented the existence of a significant problem that needs regulating, I do not believe Congress should regulate. And even in those instances, we should tread lightly.

Hance Haney

Director and Senior Fellow of the Technology & Democracy Project
Hance Haney served as Director and Senior Fellow of the Technology & Democracy Project at the Discovery Institute, in Washington, D.C. Haney spent ten years as an aide to former Senator Bob Packwood (OR), and advised him in his capacity as chairman of the Senate Communications Subcommittee during the deliberations leading to the Telecommunications Act of 1996. He subsequently held various positions with the United States Telecom Association and Qwest Communications. He earned a B.A. in history from Willamette University and a J.D. from Lewis and Clark Law School in Portland, Oregon.