Dripping reagent into test tube with liquid sample, closeup. Laboratory analysis
Dripping reagent into test tube with liquid sample, closeup. Laboratory analysis
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Humanize Pfizer Coronavirus Vaccine Not Created with Fetal Cells

Crossposted at National Review

The news that Pfizer’s vaccine is 90 percent effective has rocked the world (a tad too late to help Donald Trump). The company will be applying for an emergency FDA approval. From the Wall Street Journal story:

A vaccine developed by Pfizer Inc., PFE0.03% and partner BioNTech SE proved better than expected at protecting people from Covid-19 in a pivotal study, a milestone in the hunt for shots that can stop the global pandemic.

The vaccine proved to be more than 90% effective in the first 94 subjects who were infected by the new coronavirus and developed at least one symptom, the companies said Monday.

The positive, though incomplete, results bring the vaccine a big step closer to getting cleared for widespread use.

Pfizer said it is on track to ask health regulators for permission to sell the shot before the end of this month, if pending data indicate the vaccine is safe.

The timetable suggests the vaccine could go into distribution this month or next, though U.S. health regulators have indicated they will take some time to conduct their review.

That’s great news. But many pro-lifers have resisted taking any COVID vaccine if fetal cells taken from aborted fetuses were used in its development.

So, I checked. Pfizer’s vaccine was developed using genetic sequencing on computers without using fetal cells. As a consequence, the pro-life Charlotte Lozier Institute listed the vaccine as “ethically uncontroversial.”

That news may materially increase the number of people willing to be inoculated when the vaccine becomes generally available, perhaps avoiding a potentially explosive controversy over mandates that has been brewing in recent months.

Wesley J. Smith

Chair and Senior Fellow, Center on Human Exceptionalism
Wesley J. Smith is Chair and Senior Fellow at the Discovery Institute’s Center on Human Exceptionalism. Wesley is a contributor to National Review and is the author of 14 books, in recent years focusing on human dignity, liberty, and equality. Wesley has been recognized as one of America’s premier public intellectuals on bioethics by National Journal and has been honored by the Human Life Foundation as a “Great Defender of Life” for his work against suicide and euthanasia. Wesley’s most recent book is Culture of Death: The Age of “Do Harm” Medicine, a warning about the dangers to patients of the modern bioethics movement.