John Wohlstetter

Obama’s 1930’s: We’re at 1937

By John Wohlstetter Soon enough the Iran nuclear talks will become a replay of Munich 1938. Many pundits have drawn parallels between the last decade and the 1930s. Though the precise sequence of events eight decades ago is not being repeated, the kinds of events that transpired in the years 1933 to 1937 have been repeated in broad brushstroke during the Obama years. Continue reading at The American Spectator . . .

The Next Middle East Wars

Despite some hopeful signs from the “Arab Spring,” the Middle East is, if anything, in graver danger than before. So what does this mean for U.S. foreign policy in the region? And how should the U.S. counter totalitarian and terror threats? Read More ›

Obama’s Nuclear Gamble

John Wohlstetter, Sr. Fellow, Discovery Institute, points out that every administration makes a numbere of nuclear wagers. From peace treaties to threats, every president has made some gambles. Listen in as he discusses Obama’s nuclear gambles and his relationships with Iran, Russia, and others. Read More ›

Nuclear Arms: Sleepwalking Towards Armageddon

John Wohlstetter lectures on his upcoming book, Nuclear Arms: Sleepwalking Towards Armageddon. His goal, he says, is to take the problems of proliferation and arms control out of the hands of the so called priesthood of nuclear theologians and make the conversation palpable for the common people in order to generate discussion.

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This image was a complete experiment. I wasn’t what the final pic would look like. Essentially this is a photo of my daughter’s My Little Pony fibre-optic tree viewed through a prism. The prism was propped up on a couple of empty wine bottles and some tins of baked beans. I think the effect works!
Photo by John Adams at Unsplash

The Rise and Fall of the Ebbers Empire

WorldCom, one-time poster-boy telecom firm for the New Economy, lies in ruins. Its 19-year saga mirrors that of the once-vibrant long-distance industry. Its imminent demise, while hastened by scandal, was inevitable. The seedlings of WorldCom were planted on January 8, 1982 when Charles Brown, last chairman of legendary Ma Bell, capitulated to antitrust chief William Baxter. Facing imminent defeat in Read More ›