Topic

creation

The Man Who Was Thursday, the Nightmare of Modernity, and the Days of Creation

The Man Who Was Thursday: A Nightmare by G.K. Chesterton From the April 9, 2002 lecture at Seattle Pacific University This book is not a dispassionate philosophical treatise. Instead, it’s the account of a desperate war with high stakes: the future of human society hangs in the balance. This, Chesterton tells us, is what is really at issue when Gabriel Read More ›

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Sunlight pierces through the clouds
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The Act of Creation

For Homer the act of creating poetry is a divine gift, one that derives from an otherworldly source and is not ultimately reducible to this world. This conception of human creativity as a divine gift pervaded the ancient world, and was also evident among the Hebrews. In Exodus, for instance, we read that God filled the two artisans Bezaleel and Aholiab with wisdom so that they might complete the work of the tabernacle. Read More ›
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Mind Gap Sign On Subway Platform

Are There Gaps in the Gapless Economy?

Van Till's view of "functional integrity," while perhaps yielding aesthetic advantages to modern taste in metaphysics and theory, is implausible when confronted with orthodox Christianity. In particular, Christianity maintains that a "gap" in the natural order exists at the formation of individual human souls. Functional integrity, however, allows for no such discontinuities. Van Till cannot escape this problem. He must either abandon orthodox Christian anthropology to make his view plausible, or restrict the scope of functional integrity where human beings are concerned. Read More ›
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Saint Augustine of Hippo, Church on the Mount of Beatitudes
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Abusing Theology

Abstract: According to Howard Van Till, the early Christian fathers Basil and Augustine taught that life appeared as a consequence of creaturely capacities which God bestowed on the world from the beginning, in contrast to special creationism, which teaches that God intervened in the creation to make living things. To reconcile Christian faith with modern science, Van Till advocates recovering “the Read More ›