Education Funding

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Elementary School Science Teacher Uses Interactive Digital Whiteboard to Show Classroom Full of Children how Software Programming works for Robotics. Science Class, Curious Kids Listening Attentively
Elementary School Science Teacher Uses Interactive Digital Whiteboard to Show Classroom Full of Children how Software Programming works for Robotics. Science Class, Curious Kids Listening Attentively Photo by Gorodenkoff on Adobe Stock

Competition Is Good for Customers, but Would it Benefit Schools?

Competition benefits consumers and is viewed as advantageous to them within the marketplace. However, when it comes to K-12 education in our country, competition is the outlier. Read More ›
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Beautiful toddler sitting on the floor playing with building blocks toy at kindergarten
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With Biden It’s a Free-for-All, Preschool Included

Falling within his $1.8 trillion American Families Plans, the President is attempting to push a policy of government-provided preschool for all three- and four-year-old children. Read More ›
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money printing process concept illustration
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More Money Can’t Solve the K-12 Education Crisis

Money can’t buy happiness. Nor can pumping excessive money into our K-12 public education system buy student achievement. But people will still try, and when it doesn’t produce the desired outcome, they will try again, setting the threshold of required money higher than before. And, so the insane cycle repeats itself — again and again and again. Read More ›
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White House
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President Trump Issues Executive Order Expanding Educational Opportunity

President Trump’s December 28 executive order expands educational opportunity by providing emergency learning scholarships to disadvantaged K-12 students to access in-person learning. These grants meet an urgent need among low-income, special needs, and minority students who have been disproportionately affected by school closures. Read More ›
Scissors cutting a dollar bill in half
Money being cut showing cutbacks or wasteful spending

Budget Cuts Will Lead to Educational Regression

I was not that shocked when I read the news that Washington State’s elected leaders in both the Senate and the House are attempting to cut funding to charter schools. It’s par for the course with many of our state leaders, who have an open hostility to these schools whose success is based on their ability to escape excessive state control. What is more surprising is that the Democrat-run House and Senate are willing to stir up a storm in poor communities. In most cases, charter schools are created in neighborhoods where the schools are failing or under-performing. In Washington, by 2020 we will have 14 active public charter schools that serve nearly 4,000 students. Liv Finne, Director of Center Read More ›

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Young businessman looking at glasses
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Lucidity is Lacking

As reported on IdahoEdNews, the Bonneville School District pushed out an emergency levy worth $2 million. The issue with this emergency levy is that it does not require voter approval. The levy falls on the taxpayers’ property, and yet they have no say in the matter. Transparency is described as something that can be seen through. When it comes to transparency in government, we mean that citizens must be able to “see through” its mechanisms, to understand exactly what goes on when public officials manage public business. A government or government officials that are not transparent are more prone to corruption because there is no public oversight of their decisions. The spokeswoman of D93 Citizens, a group outspoken on this Read More ›

money cant solve it all
Licensed from Unsplash - Credit: Kat Yukawa

Sometimes You Don’t Get what You Pay For

A scan of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), “the nations report card,” makes it clear that revenues have increased significantly from 1996 to 2016 (the most recent data compiled). However, has that changed the overall outcomes for our children’s education? The data suggest it has not. According to The Hill, “Six of the top 10 states that improved their average test scores on the NAEP the most were among the 11 states with the smallest funding growth.” As our program chair, Don Nielsen, writes in his book Every School, “Spending has grown at ten times the rate of enrollment. Thus, we are now spending almost three times more per child, in inflation-adjusted dollars, to educate our children than in 1970. Most Read More ›

Sad businessman looking down standing next to open dumspter with rain of dollars falling into it.
Sad businessman looking down standing next to open dumspter with rain of dollars falling into it. Waste money. Unprofitable project. Business failure.
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Real Solutions, Not Cash Infusions

As Max C. Eden aptly states (National Review, July 30, 2019) when it comes to education, “money matters, but not if it’s simply tossed into a dysfunctional district.” He cites a recent Johns Hopkins University study regarding the dreary conditions of public schools in Providence, R.I, despite the fact that Providence spends $17,192 per pupil every year. Spending has increased significantly for the American public education system—to almost three times more per child, in inflation-adjusted dollars, than in 1970. Eden also points out that “Although education spending took a hit during the Great Recession, it has been climbing steadily over the past five years and is at an all-time high in most states.” Switching to teacher pay (which Democratic presidential Read More ›

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Transparency is a Must with Taxpayers Money

Education Week recently posed a pivotal question: “Where, exactly, do those billions of dollars taxpayers annually spend for schools go?” Those in charge of the funds sometimes don’t even know.  For example, in Mississippi the state education department “miscalculated” the exact dollar amount it would take to contribute a “$1,500 bonus” to teachers. Lawmakers with inquiries about the mistake were directed to the antiquated 20-year-old student-information system which the Mississippi Governor, Phil Bryant, referred to as being “held up by a Band-Aid”. As we’ve reported on before, taxpayers need to know where revenues from their taxes are being spent—especially the annual per student education spending. Instead, antiquated systems track billions of dollars of educational spending with little transparency from lawmakers Read More ›