Category

Economics

Center on Wealth, Poverty, and Morality

A Pox on SOX, It’s Bad for Stocks

With corporate tax reform in the rearview mirror, Congress and the Trump administration should pare back a misguided regulatory regime that imposes unnecessary costs on public companies, discourages initial public offerings, and skews the distribution of wealth toward the very rich. The problem traces back to the bursting of the dot-com bubble in the spring of 2000. Read More ›

Applications Now Open for Discovery Institute’s Gilder Fellows Seminar on Enterprise and Entrepreneurship!

The Gilder Fellows Seminar is an intimate study experience with Discovery Institute Fellows, taking place in Seattle, WA in Summer 2018. At the Gilder Fellows Seminar, you’ll have the chance to hear from scholars George Gilder, Michael Medved, Jay Richards, John West, and others. Through guided lecturers and readings, participants will explore questions such as: • Is free enterprise still the best system for human flourishing? • How do we cultivate the “spirit of enterprise”? • What do cultures need to alleviate poverty and create wealth? • How should we respond to the resurgence of interest in socialism? • Is capitalism based on Social Darwinism? • How does capitalism relate to the Bible and the Judeo-Christian tradition? • What makes Read More ›


The Tax Cuts And Jobs Act Of 2017 Is Already Delivering

If there is one thing about which most economists understand and agree it’s the law of supply and demand. A derivative of that law is that demand and velocity of transactions tend to diminish as costs increase.  While few individuals disagree about this, many in the collective body of economists have become so politicized that when it comes to the cost of variables such as taxes and regulations, that consensus all but vanishes.

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Making American Intellectual Property Great Again

A deteriorating intellectual property regime in the U.S. has been quietly unfolding over the last decade and has contributed to the declining standard of living for middle class Americans, the stagnant economy, and the outsourcing of high-tech manufacturing. The Great Recession of 2008 technically ended in June 2009, but normal recovery never got traction in the next eight years of President Obama’s two terms. Read More ›

The New Wall Street and the High Cost of Manipulating Money

Writing at The Independent Review, Senior Fellow George Gilder diagnoses the central problem with Wall Street and big banks today, which he calls “the chaos of floating currencies.” Banks used to help companies of all sectors and sizes, but the new Wall Street favors regulatory overreach, costly litigation, and financial volatility that paralyze Main Street and Silicon Valley. The transformation of American banking and finance arose from a regime of excessive financial regulation, which in turn has roots in the government’s manipulation of money. Continue reading The New Wall Street and the High Cost of Manipulating Money.


Watch: “Charting a New Course” with Steve Forbes and George Gilder

On April 5th, Steve Forbes, Chairman & Editor-In-Chief of Forbes Media, and Discovery Institute co-founder George Gilder were in Seattle to discuss some of the biggest issues facing today’s economy. Their discussion covered a wide range of pertinent topics–including trade, technological shifts, increased regulatory and tax burdens, and monetary uncertainty. Visit our YouTube channel to watch our taping of Charting a New Course: How New Ideas on Trade & Money Can Revive the U.S. Economy..


Senior Fellow Scott Powell: Trump’s Push for Deregulation

Executive Orders provide temporary relief, but long term structural change is needed for the U.S. to free itself from the regulatory leviathan and permanently limit federal bureaucracies and their army of unaccountable regulators.

Start with two statutory safeguards: 1) Congressional legislation that requires the delivery of $2 of regulatory cost reduction for every one dollar of new regulatory cost increase; and 2) Periodic Congressional reauthorization of regulations affecting industries and the economy — with sunset provisions for those not reauthorized.

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Trump wants to cut red tape? He should start with the CFPB.

Writing at The Hill, Senior Fellow Jay Richards argues that President Trump should move to abolish the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. The CFPB, a government agency created in 2011, was sold to the public as a fix to the causes of the 2008 financial crisis–but, in practice, is characterized by overreaching regulation with an unprecedented lack of oversight or accountability. Read Jay Richards’ article at The Hill.


George Gilder: Trump Can Succeed On Trade By Ending Global Currency Manipulation

Discovery Institute co-founder and Senior Fellow George Gilder writes at The Federalist: World trade in goods and services has morphed into a gigantic manipulative carnival of currency trading. This needs to change.

Folks, we have a consensus here. Formidable thinkers such as Paul Krugman, Larry Summers, and David Stockman, some 370 economists including 19 Nobel Laureates, and editors at the Economist, Fortune, and Barron’s all believe that Donald Trump as president is a menace to world trade and prosperity. Read More ›