Intelligent Design

The Center for Science and Culture

Irreducible Complexity And Darwinian Pathways

It’s official. Behe’s concept of irreducible complexity (IC) has found itself in the peer-reviewed scientific literature. Ironically, it was introduced by two critics of ID attempting to formulate non-teleological mechanisms for spawning IC. The article is: Thornhill, R.H., Ussery, D.W. 2000. “A classification of possible routes of Darwinian evolution.” J. Theor. Bio. 203: 111-116. First of all, this article shows Read More ›

fossil-trilobite-imprint-in-the-sediment-an-imprint-of-history-fossil-trilobite-in-rock-stockpack-adobe-stock.jpg
fossil trilobite imprint in the sediment. An imprint of history. Fossil trilobite in rock.
Licensed from Adobe Stock

Conversion of a Darwinist

Up until a year or so ago, I believed in evolution. Since then I have undergone a conversion to an entirely different way of thinking, a conversion that is currently provoking a counterrevolution in the way I think about everything. Read More ›
the-tower-of-babel-stockpack-adobe-stock.jpg
the tower of Babel
Licensed from Adobe Stock

Who’s Got the Magic?

In criticizing Phillip Johnson’s “intelligent design creationism,” Robert Pennock raises a particularly worrisome legal consequence of Johnson’s view. According to Pennock, Johnson insists “that science admit the reality of supernatural influences in the daily workings of the world.” But what if the same reasoning that Johnson is trying to import into science were adopted in Johnson’s own area of specialization Read More ›

martin-adams-701400-unsplash
Edison style light bulb with double helix filament
Photo by Martin Adams on Unsplash

DNA and Other Designs

For two millennia, the design argument provided an intellectual foundation for much of Western thought. From classical antiquity through the rise of modern science, leading philosophers, theologians, and scientists — from Plato to Aquinas to Newton — maintained that nature manifests the design of a preexistent mind or intelligence. Moreover, for many Western thinkers, the idea that the physical universe Read More ›

Advent-of-Algorithm-David-Berlinski

The Advent of the Algorithm

Mathematician David Berlinski, a Senior Fellow of the Discovery Institute, explains how the "algorithm" is sure to play a major role in the future of mathematics. An algorithm, Berlinski explains, is essentially a logical, mathematical procedure by which a goal can be accomplished in a finite number of steps. Read More ›
-stockpack-adobe-stock.jpg
Scientific Journals
Licensed from Adobe Stock

Science vs. Science

The debate over the teaching of evolution isn't just in Kansas anymore, as other states take up the issue. While these battles make headlines, they are the fruit of a scholarly movement that has shaken up the scientific establishment. WORLD talked to four "Intelligent Design" revolutionaries who are fighting Darwinists on their own terms. Read More ›

The Positive Case for Design

Many critics of intelligent design have argued that design is merely a negative argument against evolution. This could not be further from the truth. Leading design theorist William Dembski has observed that “[t]he principle characteristic of intelligent agency is directed contingency, or what we call choice.”1 By observing the sorts of choices that intelligent agents commonly make when designing systems, a positive case Read More ›

Defeasible Reasoning, Special Pleading and the Cosmological Argument

Introduction The cosmological argument for God’s existence has a long history, but perhaps the most enduring version of it has been the argument from contingency. This is the version that Frederick Copleston pressed upon Bertrand Russell in their debate about God’s existence in 1948. In 1997 (“A New Look at the Cosmological Argument, American Philosophical Quarterly 34:193-212), I noted that Read More ›

Photo by Jon Tyson

The Demarcation of Science and Religion

What is science? What is religion? How do the two intersect? Historians of science address these questions by analyzing how the scientific and religious beliefs of particular scientists or cultures have interacted at specific times. Philosophers of science and religion, however, have sought to characterize the relationship between them in more general terms. Their endeavor has required defining science and religion in order to distinguish or "demarcate" them from each other by clear and objective criteria. During modern times, theologians and philosophers of science have attempted to make categorical demarcations between science and religion on various definitional grounds. Read More ›