Articles

Analysing for Authorship with the Cusum Technique

Andrew Morton, widely regarded as the world authority on authorship attribution, developed the cusum (or QSUM) technique in 1988 after 40 years of research. His method identifies authorship irrespective of genre, over long periods of time, and from an early age. Since 1990 it has been accepted in law courts as a sound identifier of disputed utterance, and has been Read More ›

From Trillion Year Spree: The History of Science Fiction

by Brian W. Aldiss with David Wingrove (London: Victor Gollancz, 1986), 188-189. Aldous Huxley was the grandson of the great T.H. Huxley, the supporter of Darwin who became Wells’s instructor late in life. He achieved at least three reputations, as a cynic in the day of the Bright Young Things, as a mystical philosopher, and, after his death, as a Read More ›

C. S. Lewis on “Christian Reunion”

A passage from the essay “Christian Reunion” appeared as “Quotation of the Month” in the January 1996 issue of CSL: Bulletin of the New York C. S. Lewis Society, edited by James Como. The May-June issue features James Tetreault’s article about Peter Milward’s 1995 book A Challenge to C. S. Lewis. Tetreault, a long-time member of the New York Society, Read More ›

The Lewis Legacy-Issue 69, Summer 1996 News and Views

Correction: According to the June issue of the Southern California C. S. Lewis Society Newsletter, the on-line address for the World of CSL is really http://www.cache.net/~john/ cslewis/index.html, not the one published there earlier. Newsletter editor Sam Konkin expects to launch two new sites soon. Correction: In the spring 1996 issue, You Say Tomato, by Paul McCusker and Adrian Plass, was Read More ›

The Lewis Legacy-Issue 69, Summer 1996 Stop and Shop

Missionaries to the Skeptics: Christian Apologists for the Twentieth Century by John A Sims, Professor of Religion and History at Lee College (Macon, GA: Mercer University Press, 1995). Paper, $22.95. “Seen here in the context of their personal stories, C. S. Lewis, E. J. Carnell, and Reinhold Niebuhr give a human face to the theological task and isolate the enduring Read More ›

By Readers of The Lewis Legacy

Companions for the Soul: A yearlong journey of miracles, prayers, and epiphanies. edited by Robert R. Hudson and Shelley Townsend-Hudson (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1995). Hard cover with ribbon marker, 366 classic Christian readings, $17.99. “These devotional insights are the true treasures of our heritage — earthy, loving, celestial, sweet, deep, and holy. The Hudsons have a rich knowledge of the Read More ›

The Lewis Legacy-Issue 69, Summer 1996 Notes and Quotes

I am not either attacking or defending Evolution. I believe that Christianity can still be believed, even if Evolution is true…. Many who have been or are being moved towards Christianity by my books would be deterred by finding that I was connected with anti-Darwinism…. I can’t help sharing a sort of glee with you about the explosion of poor Read More ›

News Update on the Kilns

On 20 May 1996 Stanley Mattson sent out a new fundraising message from his C. S. Lewis Foundation in Redlands, California. The large envelope said “Postmaster, Do not bend.” Inside were: a single-spaced letter, two pages long a detailed full-page response sheet including “Stan, I have enclosed a check in the amount of $_______ to purchase the items I have Read More ›

In the Footsteps of Michelman

Music lovers were thrilled by a front page article in the Times of London on 15 December 1993, announcing the most sensational discovery of the century: “Lost Haydn Sonatas found in Germany.” The article explained that a distinguished German flautist named Winfried Michel had discovered six Haydn sonatas for the pianoforte in the home of an elderly lady in Muenster Read More ›

In the Footsteps of Hinton

Readers of Fakes, Frauds, and Other Malarkey (1993) may recall that on pp. 159-162 Lindskoog pointed to Martin A.C. Hinton as the likely perpetrator of the Piltdown Hoax, based on information in a 1990 article in New Scientist provided by George Gorniak. In 1981 New Scientist had published a series of articles by Leonard Harrison Matthews, who knew Hinton well Read More ›