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Bush’s New Book Quotes Yours Truly

Original Article

Wow. I am surprised–and very flattered. SHSer Lauren tells me that President Bush’s new book Decision Points quotes me. The Corner also takes note, because the quote is from something I wrote on NRO. Here’s what Bush wrote:

Those on the other side of the debate argued that government support for the destruction of human life would cross a moral line. “Embryonic stem cell research takes us onto a path that would transform our perception of human life into a malleable, marketable natural resource–akin to a cattle herd or copper mine–to be exploited for the benefit of the born and breathing,” bioethics expert Wesley J. Smith wrote in National Review.

I looked up the article from which Bush took the quote. It is from June 27, 2001–during the debate over what Bush should do. I also defended his policy–both against those who thought it did not go far enough and those who thought it went too far–after he made his decision on August 9, 2001.

A lot of water has flowed under the bridge since that article was written. As I read the article for the first time in nine years–frankly, I had forgotten about this one–it is amazing how little the debate has changed.

In any event, it is very nice to have had my views noticed at such a high level–whether by the former president or his ghost writer.

Wesley J. Smith

Chair and Senior Fellow, Center on Human Exceptionalism
Wesley J. Smith is Chair and Senior Fellow at the Discovery Institute’s Center on Human Exceptionalism. Wesley is a contributor to National Review and is the author of 14 books, in recent years focusing on human dignity, liberty, and equality. Wesley has been recognized as one of America’s premier public intellectuals on bioethics by National Journal and has been honored by the Human Life Foundation as a “Great Defender of Life” for his work against suicide and euthanasia. Wesley’s most recent book is Culture of Death: The Age of “Do Harm” Medicine, a warning about the dangers to patients of the modern bioethics movement.