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Homology in Biology:
Problem for Naturalistic Science and Prospect for Intelligent Design
By: Paul A. Nelson & Jonathan Wells
Darwinism, Design, and Public Education
December 1, 2003


Abstract:

This article appears in the peer-reviewed* volume Darwinism, Design, and Public Education published with Michigan State University Press. In “Homology in Biology,” Paul Nelson and Jonathan Wells reexamine the phenomenon of homology-- the structural identity of parts in distinct species such as the pentadactyl plan of the human hand, the wing of a bird, and the flipper of a seal--on which Darwin was willing to rest his entire argument. Nelson and Wells contend that Neo-Darwinism explains some of the facts of homology but leaves many significant anomalies unexplained. They argue that intelligent design can explain these anomalies and that it can also explain the other facts associated with the phenomenon of homology. As such they argue that intelligent design provides a better explanation of homology than neo-Darwinism does

Visit the Darwinism, Design, and Public Education webpage.

*Darwinism, Design, and Public Education is an interdisciplinary volume that was peer-reviewed by a professor of biological sciences, a professor of philosophy of science and a professor of rhetoric of science.


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