Debating Design -- Cambridge University Press releases new volume on scientific debate between Darwinian evolution and intelligent design

Staff
Discovery Institute
August 20, 2004

SEATTLE, AUGUST 17 – The scientific debate over biological origins continues with Cambridge University's publication of "Debating Design from Darwin to DNA," co-edited by Discovery Institute senior Fellow William Dembksi and Florida State University professor Michael Ruse.

More and more the heart of the controversy revolves around the scientific theory of intelligent design. Is the appearance of design in organisms the result of purely natural forces? Or, is the appearance of design empirically detectable and thus open to scientific inquiry?

Co-editors Dembski and Michael Ruse have pulled together the debate's most prominent participants to present the scientific arguments from all sides: Darwinism, self-organization, theistic evolution and intelligent design. Contributors include leading Darwinists such as Ken Miller and Robert Pennock, as well as intelligent design's foremost proponents such as Michael Behe and Stephen Meyer.

"Debating Design is further proof that there is a robust and growing debate about intelligent design among scientists and philosophers of science," said Dr. John West, associate director of Discovery Institute's Center for Science and Culture. "This mainstream debate represents the cutting edge of science."

Co-editor William A. Dembski is an associate research professor in the conceptual foundations of science at Baylor University as well as a senior fellow with Discovery Institute's Center for Science and Culture. His books include "The Design Revolution" (IVP, 2004), "No Free Lunch" (Rowman and Littleton, 2002). and "The Design Inference" (Cambridge, 1998).

To schedule interviews with the editors please contact Rob Crowther at rob@discovery.org.

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